248172 Edentulism trends in the United States: 1996-2007

Monday, October 31, 2011

Margo Adesanya, DDS, MPH , Office of the Director, Office of Science Policy and Analysis, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIH, NIDCR), Bethesda, MD
Amy Adams, PhD , Office of Science Policy and Analysis, NIDCR, NIH, Bethesda, MD
Amit Chattopadhyay, PhD, MDS , Office of the Director, Office of Science Policy and Analysis, NIDCR, NIH, Bethesda, MD
BACKGROUND: Trend data on edentulism, an important measure of oral health, is useful for health care planning and policy development. OBJECTIVE: To assess edentulism trends among adults in the United States from 19962007 and describe differences according to selected socio-demographic factors.

METHODS: The NIDCR/CDC Data Query System was used to analyze data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 1996-2007. Point estimates and confidence intervals for edentulism were stratified by socio-demographic/economic factors such as sex, race/ethnicity, education, and poverty levels. Proportion differences between groups and trend assessment were done using appropriate chi-square tests.

RESULTS: Preliminary results suggest that the proportion of population (age 35+ years) without teeth decreased from 14.1% to 9.8% between 1996 and 2007. Women were more likely to be edentate than men (1996: 15.5% vs. 12.5 & 2007: 10% vs. 9.5%). Trends in edentulism varied by education, but declined across all educational categories. In those with a high school education, a gradual decline from 13% to 10% was seen over the 1996-2007 period. Persons with less than a high school education had nearly a 10% reduction (declining from 32.8% to 23.3%). Although a decrease was seen across all racial/ethnic groups, disparities remained (H: 7.2%, NHW: 10.6%, NHB: 10.6%).

CONCLUSIONS: The good news is that for most Americans, edentulism has declined. However, disparities between groups did not change substantially. Hispanic Americans had the lowest percentage of edentulism. This study was supported by NIH.

Learning Areas:
Epidemiology
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
To assess edentulism trends among adults in the United States from 1996-2007 and describe differences according to selected socio-demographic factors.

Keywords: Epidemiology, Oral Health

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified to present because I oversee the science planning activities in the Office of Science Policy and Analysis for the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research at NIH.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.