248285 Practitioner and practice-level predictors of participation in a study involving Implementation and effectiveness evaluation of alcohol screening and brief intervention techniques in dental practice

Monday, October 31, 2011

James Alan Neff, PhD, MPH , College of Health Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA
Abby L. Braitman, MS , Department of Psychology, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA
Michele Darby, MS, RDH , School of Dental Hygiene, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA
Michelle L. Kelley, PhD , Department of Psychology, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA
James F. Paulson, PhD , Department of Pediatrics, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA
Tegwyn H. Brickhouse, DDS, PhD , School of Dentistry, VIrginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
John C. Gunsolley, DDS, MS , School of Dentistry, VIrginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
Scott T. Walters, PhD , Dallas Regional Campus, University of Texas School of Public Health, Dallas, TX
Margaret M. Walsh, MS, EdD , Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences; Center to Address Disparities in Chidren's Oral Health (CAN DO), University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Margaret Lemaster, MS , Gene W. Hirschfeld School of Dental Hygiene, Old Dominion University-College of Health Sciences, Norfolk, VA
Jen Dozier, MS , School of Community and Environmental Health, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA
Erin Waugh, BS , School of Community and Environmental Health, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA
Screening, Brief Intervention, Referral, and Treatment (SBIRT) protocols for alcohol abuse, proven in medical settings, have not been examined in dental practice. SBIRT adoption is hypothesized to be impacted by practitioner-level (years in practice, involvement in professional associations) and practice-level (staff resources such as number of dentists/hygienists) factors. The present analyses examine predictors of agreement to participate in a study of SBIRT effectiveness in dental settings. Approximately 387 dentists were mailed a recruitment packet soliciting their interest in participating in the study involving SBIRT adoption and effectiveness evaluation. Data are reported from 69 dentists who responded to the invitation or other recruitment efforts and ultimately agreed to participate (12 agreed; 57 refused). Dentists reported an average of 24 years of practice (range 1.5 - 45 years) and an average of 1.9 professional memberships (range 0-4). Practices primarily involved a single location (88%) with an average of 1.8 dentists (range 1 5), and 2.4 hygienists (range 0 7). An initial logistic regression analysis predicting agreement to participate (0=No; 1=Yes) suggested a complex relationship between participation and practice size, with participation positively related to number of hygienists (OR = 2.42), but negatively with number of dentists (OR = .31). Further analyses indicated that the key predictor of SBIRT study participation was the number of hygienists per dentist (OR = 2.96; 95%CI: 1.12 7.87). Practice size was less important than the relative availability of hygienist support, with greater participation among practices with a larger number of hygienists for each dentist.

Learning Areas:
Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs
Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs

Learning Objectives:
Identify practitioner and practice-level predictors of adoption of alcohol SBIRT in dental practice

Keywords: Alcohol Problems, Practice-Based Research

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am principal investigator on the NIH grant which funds this research
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.