251430 Prospective associations among youth assets, neighborhood characteristics, and tobacco use within the context of race/ethnicity and income: The Youth Asset Study (YAS)

Wednesday, November 2, 2011: 8:45 AM

Eleni Tolma, MPH, PhD , College of Public Health, Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
Sara Vesely, PhD , Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
Roy Oman, PhD , College of Public Health, Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
Cheryl Aspy, PhD , College of Medicine, Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
Lindsay Boeckman, MS , Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
The YAS is a 5-wave longitudinal study that followed 1111 youth/parent pairs to determine the impact of youth assets and other factors on youth risk behaviors, including youth tobacco use. This study's purpose is to explore prospective relationships between youth assets, neighborhood factors, race/ethnicity, federal poverty level (FPL), and tobacco use among youth. Data were analyzed using marginal logistic regression and included 1001 youth: 53% female; mean age=14.36 (SD=1.59); 26% Black, 31% Hispanic, and 43% White; 50% with income <$5,000; and 69% two-parent families. Seventeen youth assets were summed and divided at the median to form a high vs. low asset variable. Assets at Waves 1-4 and neighborhood factors at Wave 1 were used to predict tobacco use at Waves 2 5 while controlling for several demographic variables. Whites had the highest prevalence of tobacco use throughout waves 2-5, followed by Blacks and Hispanics. Youth reporting a high asset level (at waves 1-4) were more likely to report no tobacco use (at waves 2-5); however, higher odds of no tobacco use were identified among Blacks, followed by Hispanics and Whites (ORs=2.5, 2.4 and 2.0, respectively). Interestingly, youth with parents whose income was 300+% FPL and who had a more positive sense of community were twice as likely to use tobacco. Having a high number of assets is protective against tobacco use for all races. Neighborhood factors might have a negative impact on tobacco use among youth living in higher level income families.

Learning Areas:
Public health or related education
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
1. Describe variables potentially related to resistance to tobacco use including youth assets, neighborhood characteristics, youth demographics, and family SES. 2. Understand the relationships between youth assets, tobacco use, federal poverty level and environmental factors for three racial groups.

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am co-investigator of this project
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.