252477 Heart-healthy nutrient intake and cardiovascular fitness in the workplace

Tuesday, November 1, 2011: 5:30 PM

Stacey L. Tannenbaum, PhD, RD, LD/N , Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
John E. Lewis, PhD , Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL
Tainya Clarke, MPH, MS , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Cristina Fernandez, MSEd , Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
William G. LeBlanc, PhD , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine - NIOSH Research Group, Miami, FL
Lora E. Fleming, MD, PhD , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine - OHH Center and NIOSH Research Group, Miami, FL
David J. Lee, PhD , Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
The risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) within the workplace can be reduced by promoting consumption of heart-healthy nutrients (HHN) and improving cardiovascular fitness (CVF). Several studies conducted on workers found that nutrition interventions decreased CVD risk. However, little information is available regarding the relationship between HHN and CVF among different occupational groups. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between HHN (fiber, cholesterol, sodium, and fat) and CVF in white collar, service, and blue collar workers from the NHANES (1999-2004). Logistic regression was used to compute the adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for HHN (n = 3,354), using SAS-Callable SUDAAN 10.0. The average worker consumed higher than recommended amounts of cholesterol (Mean SE; 308 mg 4.90), sodium (3,382 mg 49.75), total fat (92 g 1.16), and saturated fat (31 g 0.42). Despite the higher intake of unhealthy nutrients, white collar, service, and blue collar workers were equally likely to be in the low CVF category, as those consuming a HHN diet (OR = 0.79; [95% CI: 0.62-1.02]), (0.88; [0.72-1.10]), (1.25; [0.87-1.78]), and (0.96; [0.68-1.35]), respectively. Among service workers, those consuming a low-fiber diet (16 g 0.27) were more likely to be in the low CVF category than workers consuming the recommended amount of fiber (3.57; [1.29-9.90]). Worksite wellness programs should aim to improve HHN intake for all workers, while specifically promoting the benefit of a high-fiber diet and its relationship to CVF in service workers.

Learning Areas:
Chronic disease management and prevention
Occupational health and safety
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs

Learning Objectives:
1). Identify which nutrients need to be emphasized in worksite wellness programs to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease 2). Explain the relationship between fiber and service workers 3). Discuss the difference in heart-healthy nutrient intake between blue collar, service, and white collar workers in relation to cardiovascular fitness.

Keywords: Chronic (CVD), Worksite

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am a Registered Dietitian and have studied nutrient intake in the workplace
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.

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