256494 H1N1 and Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Rates Among Veterans in the United States, 2010

Monday, October 29, 2012

Kim Tran, PhD, RN , Health Services Research & Development (HSR&D) Center of Excellence for the Study of Healthcare Provider Behavior, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System (VAGLAHS), North Hills, CA
Karen Chu, MS , Health Services Research & Development (HSR&D) Center of Excellence for the Study of Healthcare Provider Behavior, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System (VAGLAHS), North Hills, CA
Kevin C. Heslin, PhD , VHA Emergency Management Evaluation Center, Veterans Health Administration, North Hills, CA
Michael Mitchell, PhD , Health Services Research & Development (HSR&D) Center of Excellence for the Study of Healthcare Provider Behavior, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System (VAGLAHS), North Hills, CA
Aram Dobalian, PhD, JD , Health Services Research & Development (HSR&D) Center of Excellence for the Study of Healthcare Provider Behavior, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System (VAGLAHS), North Hills, CA
Background Influenza causes an estimated 200,000 hospitalizations and 36,000 deaths in the U.S. annually, mostly among vulnerable populations such as Veterans of the armed forces. Vaccination is the primary means both to prevent infection and to reduce complications among those who become infected. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend annual influenza vaccination, particularly for high-risk populations.

Objectives Using 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data on 1,253 honorably discharged Veterans, we estimate the prevalence of receipt of seasonal influenza and H1N1 vaccinations, and identify factors that may be barriers to, or facilitators of, influenza vaccination in this population.

Methods We analyzed NHIS data using bivariate and multivariate methods. Outcome measures were self-reported seasonal and H1N1 vaccination in the past 12 months.

Results Approximately 28% and 54% of Veterans received the H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccination, respectively, in 2010. Receipt of H1N1 vaccination was independently associated (p<0.05) with having a college education, health insurance, and a usual source of care, as well as with being at high risk for infection based on age and health conditions (according to CDC guidelines). Men had lower odds of receiving the H1N1 vaccination than did women (OR, 0.59; 95% CI: 0.35-0.98). Receipt of seasonal vaccination was independently associated with college education, health insurance, and being at high risk. Smokers had lower odds of receiving the seasonal vaccination than did non-smokers (OR, 0.51; 95% CI: 0.35-0.79).

Conclusions Vaccination programs for Veterans should target men and smokers to prevent influenza illness and related complications.

Learning Areas:
Epidemiology
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
To describe the prevalence of receipt of the seasonal influenza and H1N1 vaccinations among honorably discharged Veterans using the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data. To name predictors of seasonal influenza and H1N1 vaccinations. To identify high-risk Veterans that are less likely to receive the influenza vaccinations according to the CDC guidelines.

Keywords: Epidemiology, National Health Interview Survey

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: Currently, I am a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Veterans Affairs Center of Excellence for the Study of Healthcare Provider Behavior as well as a UCLA faculty in the School of Nursing. My research interest is in health disparities and examining access to care among vulnerable populations using quantitative and qualitative methods. I have been a co-principal focusing on multiple projects on the epidemiology with a particular scientific interest in influenza vaccinations among Veterans.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.