257681 Dating violence and psychosocial risk correlates among District of Columbia adolescents: The syndemic relationship

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Amanda E. Borsky, MPP, DrPH Student , Prevention and Community Health, George Washington University SPHHS, Washington, DC
Karen A. McDonnell, PhD , Prevention and Community Health, George Washington University SPHHS, Washington, DC
Elizabeth Reed, ScD, MPH , Prevention and Community Health, George Washington University SPHHS, Washington, DC
Physical dating violence (DV) and sexual violence (SV) victimization among adolescents can result in negative physical and mental health consequences. Prior national research has demonstrated an association between psychosocial risk correlates and DV/SV victimization. Given that Washington, D.C. has a higher prevalence of DV (17%) compared to the national average (10%), understanding these correlates for adolescents in this region can facilitate the development of primary prevention interventions to reduce the health consequences of DV/SV. The population included ninth through twelfth grade adolescents in D.C. who completed the 2003, 2005, or 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (n=5,474). Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to assess DV/SV victimization with risk correlates (i.e., other violence, psychological well-being, substance use, and sexual risk behaviors). For recent DV, there was a positive association with recent reports of fighting, weapon carrying, feeling sad/hopeless, excessive drinking, and lack of condom use (ORs range from 1.6 2.5). For lifetime SV, there was a positive association with recent reports of feeling sad/hopeless, considering suicide, having multiple sex partners, and lack of condom use (ORs range from 1.6 3.5). There were no significant differences across years for DV; however, there was a decrease in SV over time. These findings suggest a strong correlation between DV/SV and psychosocial risk correlates among D.C. adolescents. Findings are congruent with prior national research on the topic and highlight the local need for DV/SV prevention as well as services to reduce the health burden related to DV among youth in DC.

Learning Areas:
Assessment of individual and community needs for health education
Conduct evaluation related to programs, research, and other areas of practice
Public health or related education
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
Identify psychosocial risk correlates associated with physical dating violence and sexual violence among adolescents in Washington, D.C. Assess the risk correlates for adolescents in this region to facilitate the development of primary prevention interventions to reduce the health consequences of DV/SV.

Keywords: Adolescent Health, Violence Prevention

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: For this paper, I identified the research question, conducted the literature review, conducted the data management and analyses, and developed the findings and conclusions. I worked with faculty members (listed as co-authors) throughout this process; the faculty members provided me with critical feedback and suggestions on my independently conducted work. In addition, through other professional work, I have experience managing and directing studies from a variety of federally funded contracts.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.