258070 Social, environmental and policy determinants of physical activity in rural adults in Iowa

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Matthew Chrisman, PhD , Department of Community and Behavioral Health, University of Iowa, College of Public Health, Iowa City, IA
Faryle Nothwehr, MPH, PhD , Department of Community and Behavioral Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
Kathleen Janz, EdD , Health and Human Physiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
Jingzhen Yang, PhD, MPH , Community and Behavioral Health, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
Jacob Oleson, PhD , Department of Biostatistics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
Joe Coulter, PhD , Community and Behavioral Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
Background: Rural adults are less likely to meet physical activity (PA) recommendations than urban or suburban adults, and there is a need to understand what enables and inhibits this behavior among different domains (rather than just total PA or leisure time PA), especially in rural communities. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was administered in-person to 407 adults in two rural Iowa towns to examine PA in four domains (homecare, work, active living, and sport). Additionally, we measured potential environmental determinants such as barriers to exercise, social determinants such as receiving encouragement for exercise, and policy determinants such as attitudes towards using government funds for exercise facilities. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations among these determinants and PA in each of those four domains. Results: A positive attitude towards zoning regulations that include walking paths was significantly associated with PA in the active living domain (p=0.024). While having friends who encourage exercise was positively associated with PA in active living (p=0.004) and sport (p<0.001), barriers to PA exhibited negative associations with these two domains. None of the environmental, social, or policy determinants were associated with PA in homecare or work domains. Conclusions: Environmental and social factors are associated with PA in active living and sport. Factors that influence PA appear to be domain-specific, and future studies should consider this when designing interventions. An intervention that improves the support of friends and policy attitudes is likely to increase active living and sport PA in rural adults.

Learning Areas:
Assessment of individual and community needs for health education
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
1.Participants will be able to describe at least two environmental, social, or policy factors that may affect physical activity in rural Iowan adults. 2.Participants will be able to identify at least two ways that physical activity domains differ in regards to their association with rural Iowan adultsí perceptions of social, environmental and policy determinants of physical activity. 3.Participants will be able to identify at least two possible determinants to target for designing a physical activity intervention among rural Iowan adults.

Keywords: Physical Activity, Rural Populations

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have been the principal author on this project, and have conducted one other similar study of the gender differences regarding perceived social, environmental, and policy determinants of physical activity. My interests are to determine what environmental factors can be targeted for increasing physical activity in a rural community.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.