258206 Community Child Health Network (CCHN)'s 5-site study of preconception health of parents and fetal programming

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 : 10:30 AM - 10:47 AM

Sharon Landesman Ramey, PhD , Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, Virginia Tech, Roanoke, VA
Robin Gaines Lanzi, PhD, MPH , Department of Health Behavior, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
Peter Schafer , Consultant, Baltimore City Healthy Start, Brooklyn, NY
Julie De Clerque, DrPH, MPH , Sheps Center for Health Services Research, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC
Robin Gaines Lanzi , Community Child Health Network, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA
This paper provides an overview of the NIH Community Child Health Network (CCHN) a 5-site multidisciplinary network that includes community and academic partners, operates with explicit principles of community-based participatory research, and is conducting a first ever prospective study of preconception health of both mothers and fathers. We will present the CCHN conceptual framework for reducing health disparities associated with reproduction and child development, along with findings from >2400 families during the early post-partum period. Innovative features of the CCHN study include: (1) collecting self-reports from mothers and fathers about resources, relationship, stress levels, experiences of racism/discrimination, and social support; (2) measuring maternal allostatic load to assess biological stress indicators before, during, and after pregnancy; and (3) gathering data about neighborhood, community, and societal resources/risks hypothesized to influence pregnancy and child outcomes. The majority of study parents are low-income and not married, although often are living together just after the birth of their baby. Mothers report higher rates of depressive symptoms, lower financial resources, and different types of social supports than do fathers. Among low-income families, including those with a prior premature and/or low birth weight infant, there is considerable diversity in terms of their early post-partum experiences and their health risks for a subsequent pregnancy. These early descriptive findings will be considered in terms of how they could inform the design of novel, promising, and community-endorsed interventions to improve outcomes for a subsequent pregnancy, as well as promote healthy fetal programming and subsequent positive postnatal supports for children.

Learning Areas:
Conduct evaluation related to programs, research, and other areas of practice
Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs
Public health or related nursing
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences
Systems thinking models (conceptual and theoretical models), applications related to public health

Learning Objectives:
Analyze early descriptive findings from the Community Child Health Network in terms of how they could inform the design of novel, promising, and community-endorsed interventions to improve the outcomes for a subsequent pregnancy, as well as promote healthy fetal programming and subsequent positive postnatal supports for children.

Keywords: Maternal and Child Health, Pregnancy Outcomes

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified to be an abstract Author because I am the Academic PI on the CCHN DC site parent grant and have been since its inception. I have nearly forty years of experience developing, implementing, and analyzing research programs designed to improve the lives of mothers and fathers, young children, and families.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.