258410 Beliefs and Attitudes About Sleep among Community-Dwelling Black Men

Monday, October 29, 2012 : 9:15 AM - 9:30 AM

Abhishek Pandey, MD , Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Dmitriy Gekhman , Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Prince Odigie , Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Chelsea Jin , Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Josue Roseus , Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Mirnova Ceide, MD , Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Girardin Jean-Louis, PhD , Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Background: The study assessed risk of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and beliefs and attitudes about sleep among black men in the barbershop.Method: Respondents were black adult male customers (n=247; mean age=38.814.8 years) attending several barbershops in Brooklyn, NY. They provided sociodemographic data and estimated habitual sleep time. The Apnea Risk Evaluation System (ARES) was used to identify men at high OSA risk (cut-off: >5). The Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep Scale (DBAS) was used to quantify strength of endorsed attitudes/beliefs toward sleep. DBAS is a Likert-type scale requiring men to circle a number from 0 (strongly disagree) to 10 (strongly agree); higher average score indicated more dysfunctional attitudes/beliefs about sleep. Results: Of the sample, 64% were overweight/obese (BMI>25); 23% reported hypertension, 11%, diabetes, and 4% heart disease. Estimated rates of sleep-related problems were: nap=33%, Difficulty Initiating Sleep (DIS)=26%, Difficulty Maintaining Sleep (DMS)=22%, and sleep medicine use=5%. Rate of short sleep (<6h) was 51%; 34% were satisfied with their sleep. ARES data showed 27% were at high OSA risk. The mean DBAS score was 4.292.06; DBAS values adjusting for effects of age, BMI, HTN, DM, and sleep variables were used in ANCOVA. Men at high OSA risk had greater DBAS scores [F1,129=7.73, p<0.001] and tended to report greater rate of sleep dissatisfaction [46% vs. 13%, X2=24.52, p<0.001]. Conclusion: Black men at high risk for OSA have dysfunctional beliefs about sleep might explain low adherence rates to physician-recommended sleep assessment in that population.

Learning Areas:
Assessment of individual and community needs for health education
Diversity and culture
Provision of health care to the public
Public health or related education
Public health or related public policy
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
Assess associations of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Risk with beliefs and attitudes toward sleep among black men in the barbershops. Discuss novel message delivery methods.

Keywords: African American, Community Involvement

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am an investigator on the community engagement project. I have been conducting research related to this topic for nearly two years.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.