259338 Smoking in taxis: Findings from a problem-solving approach to tobacco control policy enforcement

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Maritt Kirst, Phd , Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Ontario Tobacco Research Unit, Toronto, ON, Canada
Cora McCloy, Phd , Ontario Tobacco Research Unit, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
Erika Yates, MSc , Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Ontario Tobacco Research Unit, Toronto, ON, Canada
Farzana Haji, MSc , Ontario Tobacco Research Unit, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
Roberta Ferrence, PhD , Ontario Tobacco Research Unit, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada
Utilizing a problem-solving and community engagement approach to tobacco control policy enforcement, this presentation includes findings from a smoke-free taxi vehicle study conducted in one urban Canadian community. The local participating public health unit identified taxis as a high-risk site for non-compliance to the Smoke-Free Ontario Act (tobacco control legislation effective 2006). Baseline data assessed the extent of the problem of smoking in taxis and informed the development of a public health intervention. Tobacco control researchers, health promotion practitioners, and tobacco enforcement officers were engaged in all stages of the project.

Baseline data that described the extent of the problem include: measures of third-hand smoke levels in taxis; taxi passenger intercept surveys; and, key themes from both taxi drivers' focus groups and interviews with taxi administrators. Based on these findings the public health unit designed a health promotion campaign to eliminate cigarette smoking in taxis. A variety of social marketing tools were developed to raise awareness of the problem and existing fines associated with policy non-compliance amongst the target population (drivers and passengers) and more broadly to the general public. Post intervention research findings will draw from surveys and interviews with taxi passengers, drivers, administrators and public health unit stakeholders to capture campaign awareness levels, perceptions of campaign effectiveness, and challenges and facilitators in all stages of the health promotion campaign. This presentation will draw attention to an evidence-informed health promotion campaign that involved collaborative efforts between researchers and public health staff.

Learning Areas:
Assessment of individual and community needs for health education
Conduct evaluation related to programs, research, and other areas of practice
Occupational health and safety
Public health or related public policy

Learning Objectives:
1. Define the problem-solving approach to tobacco control policy enforcement 2. Assess the effectiveness of a smoke-free taxi vehicle health promotion campaign on increasing compliance to the Smoke-Free Ontario Act

Keywords: Tobacco Policy, Public Health Education and Health Promotion

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: Maritt Kirst is an Assistant Professor at the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. Dr. Kirstís research focuses on the evaluation of tobacco control policies and other public health interventions, and social contextual effects on substance use and mental health outcomes.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.