260875 Parental knowledge of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in the US

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Whitney P. Witt, PhD, MPH , Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
Lauren E. Wisk, BS , Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
Objective/Background: We sought to determine the factors related to parental knowledge of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, using a nationally representative population-based sample. Methods: Data on 5,932 parents of children ages 8-17 years were from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey. Parents were asked if they had ever heard of HPV vaccines. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to examine the odds of parental knowledge of the HPV vaccine. Covariates included child, parent and family sociodemographics and child health, preventive care, and insurance. Results: 62.5% of US parents knew about the HPV vaccine. Multivariable results revealed that parents were more likely to know about the HPV vaccine if their child was female (OR 1.92, 95% CI: 1.66-2.21), older (OR 1.04, 95% CI: 1.01-1.06), had received a well-check up in the last 12 months (OR 1.30, 95% CI: 1.12-1.52), or if the parent was unmarried (OR 1.49, 95% CI: 1.11-2.00). Parents were less likely to know about the HPV vaccine if their child was of minority race or ethnicity, if they had a low level of education, if the family was living in poverty, or if the child was uninsured. Conclusions: Improving access to preventive pediatric healthcare offers an opportunity to increase parental knowledge of the HPV vaccine. However significant racial/ethnic, socioeconomic, and health insurance disparities remain. Reducing disparities in parents' knowledge and awareness will arm parents with vital information about the vaccine that may lead to increases in vaccination rates and improved health outcomes for children across their life spans.

Learning Areas:
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
Learning Objectives: By the end of this session, the participants will be able to Describe the disparities in parental knowledge of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination ; Explain the implications for public health and clinical practice ;

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have been the principal investigator of federally funded grants focused on child health.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.