261476 Using community-based participatory research to address disparities in obesity and diabetes among Latinos and American Indians: A focus on the partnership development process

Tuesday, October 30, 2012 : 9:15 AM - 9:30 AM

Lisa Rosas, PhD MPH , Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
Jan V. Chacon, BS Health Science , CHES , Community Wellness and Outreach Dept., Indian Health Center of Santa Clara Valley, San Jose, CA
Ramin Naderi, MA Kinesiology , Community Wellness and Outreach Dept., Indian Health Center of Santa Clara Valley, San Jose, CA
Rhonda McClinton-Brown, MPH , Office of Community Health, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Jill Evans, MPH , Office of Community Health, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Liz Hunt, MSW , Indian Health Center of the Santa Clara Valley, San Jose, CA
Randall Stafford, MD PhD , Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
Obesity and its clinical consequences, such as diabetes, are more prevalent among socially disadvantaged groups in the US, including low-income Latinos and American Indians. Latinos and American Indians are more than twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to have diabetes. In 2011, with institutional support from the Stanford Office of Community Health (OCH), the Indian Health Center (IHC), in San Jose, California that serves a diverse population of primarily Latinos and American Indians, formed a CBPR partnership with Stanford researchers to address these disparities. We will highlight the important role the academic community engagement office played in overcoming barriers to partnership development, such as lack of trust and resources. We will also describe the group process used to establish guiding principles, operating norms and procedures, and key objectives for the partnership. Using a tool developed by Shultz et al in 2003, the evaluation of the partnership development process revealed several facilitating factors: 1) The OCH was critical in building trust between the partners and guiding the participatory group process . 2) Prior to partnering, the IHC and their academic partners had overlapping and well-articulated goals. These goals focused on testing innovative approaches to chronic disease prevention and management targeting at risk populations that could be disseminated broadly. 3) Recognizing the unique strengths of each individual within the partnership, while acknowledging the multiple motivations for research, was crucial for building a successful partnership. Overall, the participatory process, although complex and involved, was critical to forming a strong foundation for future research.

Learning Areas:
Chronic disease management and prevention
Conduct evaluation related to programs, research, and other areas of practice
Diversity and culture
Systems thinking models (conceptual and theoretical models), applications related to public health

Learning Objectives:
1. Understand the advantages of a triad approach (Community partner-Faculty partner academic community engagement office) to partnership development with a Community Based Participatory Research orientation 2. Utilize existing frameworks and instruments (e.g. by Shultz et al) to evaluate the partnership development process on an ongoing basis 3. Apply innovative partnership development strategies used in the current project to future Community Based Participatory Research partnerships, especially those addressing disparities in obesity and diabetes

Keywords: Community-Based Partnership, Diabetes

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I participated in the described research and wrote the abstract
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.