263270 Association between female genital mutilation and intimate partner violence

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 : 9:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Hamisu Salihu, MD, PhD , Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Florida, College of Public Health, Tampa, FL
Euna M. August, PhD, MPH , Department of Community and Family Health, University of South Florida, College of Public Health, Tampa, FL
Jason L. Salemi, MPH , Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Florida, College of Public Health, Tampa, FL
Hanna Weldeselasse , Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Florida, College of Public Health, Tampa, FL
Yya Sadio Sarro, PharmD, MSPH , Serefo, University of Bamako, Bamako, Mali
Amina Alio, PhD , Department of Community & Preventive Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
Background: Female genital mutilation (FGM) and intimate partner violence (IPV) are health and human rights issues with high prevalence in Africa and long-term ramifications on the quality of life of women and their families. Despite the likelihood of shared socio-cultural causes, the relationship between the two has not been understudied. In this study, we assessed whether FGM is a risk factor for IPV. Methods: This nationally representative cross-sectional study utilized the 2006 Demographic Health Survey (DHS) conducted in Mali. The study population consisted of women aged 15-49 years who responded to the Domestic Violence and Female Genital Cutting modules of the DHS (N=7,962). The outcomes of interest were self-reported IPV and its subtypes (physical, sexual, and emotional), while the exposure was FGM. Multivariable logistic regression modeling was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), while accounting for the complex sampling design of the DHS. Results: Within the study population, 87.8% reported FGM, and 23.6% reported exposure to IPV. One-fourth (25.4%) of women with FGM also reported IPV, compared to 11.5% of women without FGM (p<0.0001). Women with FGM were more than twice as likely to experience IPV (AOR=2.68; 95% CI=2.17-3.30) or an IPV subtype physical (AOR=2.76; 95% CI=2.18-3.49), sexual (AOR=2.81; 95% CI=1.68-4.69), or emotional (AOR=2.22; 95% CI=1.67-2.96). Conclusions: We found FGM to be risk factor for IPV. Multi-tiered strategies that incorporate advocacy, policy change, and education to reduce the prevalence of FGM may potentially reduce IPV against women.

Learning Areas:
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs
Public health or related education
Public health or related laws, regulations, standards, or guidelines
Public health or related public policy
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
1. Explain the incidence of female genital mutilation in Mali. 2. Describe the distribution of female genital mutilation and intimate partner violence in Mali by important sociodemographic characteristics. 3. Discuss the impact of female genital mutilation in Mali on intimate partner violence.

Keywords: Female Genital Mutilation, Domestic Violence

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I was involved in all aspects of this study.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.