265402 Concordance of Risk Behavior Reporting in Injecting Partnerships Between Young Injection Drug Users in San Francisco

Tuesday, October 30, 2012 : 9:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Jennifer Evans, MS , Prevention and Public Health Group, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Michelle Yu, BA , Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Meghan Morris, PhD , Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Kimberly Page, PhD, MPH , Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Judith Hahn, PhD , Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Purpose: Young injection drug users (IDU, under age 30) usually inject with other IDU, and risk behaviors that increase the likelihood of blood-borne disease transmission commonly occur within injecting partnerships. However, self-reported injecting behavior may be subject to reporting bias, therefore we sought to estimate the degree of concordance of reporting injecting risk behaviors between injecting dyads Methods: From May 2006 to October 2011 we enrolled 53 injecting partnerships that were hepatitis C virus (HCV) discordant on RNA testing in San Francisco, California. Each partnership was followed prospectively for up to one year. Monthly interviews from each partner were date-matched and responses to risk behavior questions were compared. Concordance of reporting of injecting risk behaviors was estimated with the Kappa statistic. Results: Participants had a median age of 26, IQR:23-28 and median years injecting of 8.1, IQR:3.1 10.8. Forty percent of the injecting partnerships were also sexual partnerships while 60% were solely injecting partnerships. Sixty percent were female-male and 38% were male-male partnerships. At enrollment, 27%, 24%, 34% and 33 % of the participants reported engaging in receptive syringe sharing, distributive syringe sharing, receptive cooker sharing , and distributive cooker sharing with their partners in the prior month. Dyad concordance for these behaviors was 79%, 86%, 81% and 74% respectively. Conclusions: Injecting partners reported frequent cooker sharing and less frequent syringe sharing. We observed moderately high agreement in reporting of injection risk behavior in partnership dyads. This suggests that self-reported risk behavior within partnerships may be a valid way to measure partner-specific injecting risk.

Learning Areas:
Epidemiology
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
1. Describe injecting partnerships 2. Compare self-reported risk behavior within an injecting dyad and assess concordance. 3. Discuss implications of results for the design of dyadic research studies.

Keywords: Injection Drug Users, Partnerships

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have over 15 years of experience in the field of epidemiology and have been the principal statistician for the UFO Study for the past 13 years. Among my specific interests has been Hepatitis C infection in young drug users focusing on risk factors for acquisition, predictors of injection cessation and mortality.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.

Back to: 4030.0: Social Epidemiology 1