265806 Food insecurity is associated with higher saturated fat intake and dyslipidemia in Wisconsin adults

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Jung-Im Shin, MD, MPH , Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
Matt Walsh, PhD, MPH , Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
Kristen Malecki, PhD , Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI
Leonelo Bautista, MD, MPH, Dr PH , Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
F. Javier Nieto, MD, MPH, PhD , Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
We investigated whether food insecurity, lack of consistent access to adequate food, was associated with higher saturated fat intake and dyslipidemia, in a population-based sample of 1355 adults from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin (2008-2010). The Blocked Dietary Data System survey was used to assess dietary intake. We used multiple logistic and linear regression models to estimate the associations, while controlling for age, gender, race and ethnicity, education, income, smoking, alcohol use, body mass index, and physical activity. Food insecurity, measured by responding yes to any of five food security questions adapted from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, had a prevalence of 25.4% in our study. Compared to food-secure participants, food-insecure participants were more likely to have hypercholesterolemia (total blood cholesterol level>240mg/dl or taking prescribed lipid-lowering medication): adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.7[95% confidence limit (CL) 1.0-2.9], p=0.03. Also, food-insecure participants were more likely to have low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level (<40mg/dl in men and <50 mg/dl in women): AOR 2.1 [95% CL 1.0-4.4], p=0.05. Among participants with hypercholesterolemia, food-insecure participants had higher saturated fat intake than food-secure participants only among those who are unaware of their condition (mean difference = 10.9g [95% CL 10.3-11.5g], p<0.01). Our findings suggest that food insecurity is associated with higher saturated fat intake and may increase the risk of dyslipidemia. Policy changes to support reductions in food insecurity may help to reduce health disparities in cardiovascular disease outcomes.

Learning Areas:
Chronic disease management and prevention
Epidemiology

Learning Objectives:
1. Explain the association between food insecurity and dyslipidemia. 2. Explain the effect of food insecurity on fat intake. 3. Discuss the importance of reduction in food insecurity to decrease health disparites in cardiovascular disease outcome.

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have been working for the Survey of the Health of the Wisconsin (SHOW), a novel infrastructure for population health research, modeled after the Center for Disease Controlís (CDC) national survey (NHANES). My scientific interests have been cardiovascular disease prevention and health disparities in cardiovascular disease outcome.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.