266039 Partners in cervical cancer prevention: What do men know about the Papanicolaou (Pap) test?

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Christopher Wheldon, MSPH, MEd , Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Ellen Daley, PhD , Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Eric R. Buhi, MPH, PhD , Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Natalie D. Hernandez, MPH , Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Cheryl A. Vamos, PhD, MPH , Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Erica Hesch Anstey, MA, CLC , Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Elizabeth Baker, MPH, CPH , Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Judith Ebbert, MPH, BS, RN , Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Introduction: Men's roles in cervical cancer prevention are both in the transmission of HPV, the fundamental cause of cervical cancer, and as possible sources of influence in women's knowledge, access, and utilization of preventive health services. Men's knowledge of screening tools has not been widely explored; thus, this study's purpose was to identify factors associated with men's knowledge of the Pap test. Methods: Data from three U.S. studies were analyzed. Study 1 (N=536) included men participating in an HPV natural history study, Study 2 (N=202) and 3 (N=245) included men enrolled at a large southeastern university; Study 3 specifically targeted ethnic/racial minorities. Study 1 was conducted from 2007-2008; Studies 2 and 3 in 2008 and 2011, respectively. Responses were analyzed separately for each study. Results: Knowledge of the pap smear as a test for cervical cancer was reported by 72% of men in Study 1, 40% in Study 2, and 60% in Study 3. In Study 1, men with less than a college education were less likely to know the purpose of Pap tests. Being married/partnered was positively associated with Pap smear knowledge in both Study 2 and 3. In all studies, knowing the potential consequences (i.e., cervical cancer) of HPV was predictive of Pap smear knowledge. Men commonly misunderstood the Pap test as a test for STDs. Conclusion: Men's Pap test knowledge differed substantially across studies, which appears to result from differences in educational attainment, relationship status, and HPV knowledge. Targeting men in HPV education campaigns could prove useful.

Learning Areas:
Advocacy for health and health education
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
Discuss menís roles in cervical cancer prevention. Identify factors associated with menís knowledge of Pap tests. Discuss possible health education messages aimed at increasing menís knowledge of HPV and cervical cancer prevention.

Keywords: Women's Health, Cancer Prevention

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am an investigator on the studies reported in this abstract.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.