266580 Nonfatal traumatic brain injuries in the construction industry, 2001-2005

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Srinivas Konda, MPH , Division of Safety Research, National Istitute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV
Hope Tiesman, PhD, MSPH , Division of Safety Research, CDC/NIOSH, Morgantown, WV
Audrey A. Reichard, MPH, OTR , Division of Safety Research, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV
Background: Research on work-related injuries in the construction industry is extensive, but little research has focused on traumatic brain injuries (TBIs).This study describes nonfatal work-related TBIs in the construction industry treated in emergency departments (EDs) from 2001 through 2005.

Methods: Nonfatal work-related TBIs in the construction industry were analyzed from the occupational supplement to the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS-Work). Cases were included if the diagnosis was concussion; if the diagnosis was internal organ injury or fracture and the injured body part was head. Rates were calculated using Current Population Survey labor force estimates.

Results: There were an estimated 42,500 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 17,000) ED treated work-related TBIs in the construction industry during the 5-years. The overall rate was 8.2 (CI=3.3) per 10,000 full-time equivalent workers (FTE). These account for approximately 15% of all work-related TBIs, which is disproportionate with the 8% of the labor force represented by the construction industry. Young workers (16-24 years) experienced the highest rate among all workers (16.9 per 10,000 FTE, CI=6.5). Falls (48%) and contact with objects and equipment (41%) were the most common events. Approximately 20% of construction industry TBIs were hospitalized, compared to 4% hospitalization of all nonfatal ED treated construction industry injuries.

Conclusions: Nonfatal TBIs can require more medical care than many other ED treated work-related injuries. Construction workers, especially young workers, are at increased risk for TBI. The construction industry needs to focus efforts on prevention of TBI, especially from falls and contact with objects and equipment.

Learning Areas:
Epidemiology
Occupational health and safety

Learning Objectives:
1.Describe the numbers and rates of nonfatal work-related TBIs in the construction industry. 2.Identify the leading causes of nonfatal work-related TBIs in the construction industry

Keywords: Construction Injuries, Traumatic Brain Injury

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I work as an associate service fellow and in collaboration with the co-authors I have retrieved, analyzed and prepared the data.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.