268245 Relationship status's impact on sexual risk behavior and knowledge obtained in an effective intervention in Mississippi

Monday, October 29, 2012

Dantrell Simmons, MA , Center for Research, Evaluation, Environmental and Policy Change, My Brother's Keeper, Inc., Jackson, MS
Christopher Roby, MA , Center for Research, Evaluation, Environmental and Policy Change, My Brother's Keeper, Inc., Jackson, MS
June Gipson, PhD , Center for Research, Evaluation, Environmental and Policy Change, My Brother's Keeper, Inc., Jackson, MS
DeMarc Hickson, PhD , Center for Research, Evaluation, Environmental and Policy Change, My Brother's Keeper, Inc., Jackson, MS
Background: African American men who have sex with men (AAMSM) represented 74% of the MSM population infected with HIV/AIDS. Studies have shown that increased social support reduces risk of contracting HIV, yet the rate of infection is steadily increasing. Methods: During 2007-2011, self-reported assessments were obtained from participants to determine whether current partnership impacts risk behaviors and knowledge obtained from the Population Opinion Leader (POL) Intervention. Chi-square tests were used to determine if there was an association between knowledge and high risk behaviors among those currently in a relationship versus those not in a relationship. Results: A total of 217 AA MSM (age: 18-35 years) residing in the Jackson, MS participated in 20 waves of the POL Intervention. 32% of the AAMSM participants self-reported being in a monogamous relationship and 47% reported being single. Of those who reported being partnered, 50% indicated ever not using a condom while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. 60% reported ever meeting guys from off the internet, and 17% reported ever cruising the parks. Compared to those who were single, those who reported partnership were less likely to worry about contracting HIV or an STD and had a lower knowledge that having an STD increases the chances of contracting HIV or transmitting it to their partner. Conclusions: Given the high prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the AAMSM community, HIV prevention programs should increase their efforts on partnered relationship intervention and education material as well as underpinning the importance of participating in a monogamous relationship.

Learning Areas:
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
Compare the knowledge and sexual risk behavior among African American Men who have sex with men(AA MSM)ages 18 and over who attended the Popular Opinion Leader intervention from 2007-2011.

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am currently a doctoral student in the field of epidemiology as well as a full-time Research Associate at My Brotherís Keeper, Inc. I also hold a Master's of Arts degree in Clinical Psychology with experience of providing group and individual therapy in regards to the effects of HIV/AIDS. Previously, I have worked on a Program Evaluation Team where I assessed the effectiveness of an HIV DEBI prevention program.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.

Back to: 3405.0: Sexual Risk Reduction