269081 Positively pregnant: Pregnancy testing for high risk adolescents in non-traditional locations

Monday, October 29, 2012 : 3:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Jennifer Oliphant, EdD, MPH , Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Health and Medicine, University of Minnesota, Healthy Youth Development-Prevention Research Center, Minneapolis, MN
Danielle LeVasseur , Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Health and Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Annie-Laurie McRee, DrPH , Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Health and Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Kara Beckman, MA , Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Health and Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Shari Plowman, MPH , Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Health and Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Renee Sieving, PhD, RN , School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Background: While pregnancy is commonly assessed via self-report, adolescents may not report pregnancy accurately or consistently. Incorporating biomarkers such as urine pregnancy testing (UPT) in evaluating community-based interventions has the potential to reduce reporting bias. We sought to determine the acceptability and feasibility of UPT in community settings, and to elicit adolescents' preferred methods for receiving UPT results. Methods: This pilot study involved girls aged 16-20 (n=28) at high risk for unintended pregnancy. In community locations convenient for individual participants (e.g., coffee shops, libraries, fast food restaurants), girls completed a structured qualitative interview about UPT; 19 of 28 (68%) also provided a urine sample for pregnancy testing. Interview questions focused on participants' comfort with UPT in traditional and non-traditional locations and their preferences for receiving results. Interviews were content analyzed to identify common themes. Rapid pregnancy tests were completed on urine samples. Results: Participants commonly noted that other teens would be willing to provide urine samples. Participants reported being most comfortable with UPT in clinic, school, and home settings. However, all participants who provided a urine sample (68%) did so at a non-traditional location (fast food, coffee shop or library). Participants preferred to learn about UPT results by phone or in person. Conclusions: Findings suggest that community-based UPT is both feasible and acceptable among adolescents at high risk of unintended pregnancy. Incorporating an objective biomarker, such as UPT, into community-based interventions extends the use of this technology into non-traditional settings and improves pregnancy measurement.

Learning Areas:
Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs
Basic medical science applied in public health
Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
Describe ways to use the information to incorporate UPT in community-based settings. Discuss potential effectiveness of UPT in wide-scale settings.

Keywords: Adolescent Health, Teen Pregnancy

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: Jennifer Oliphant, EdD, MPH is the Community Outreach Coordinator for the Healthy Youth Development-Prevention Research Center (PRC), Division of Adolescent Health and Medicine at the University of Minnesota. There, she assists communities in developing pregnancy prevention programming based on best practices in the field of youth development, community collaboration and adolescent health. She also coordinates the Centerís peer education program.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.