269176 Health insurance status, physical activity, and Human Papillomavirus (HPV): Differences in vaccination receipt among US adults

Tuesday, October 30, 2012 : 3:05 PM - 3:20 PM

Jenelle Lin, BS , Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Tainya C. Clarke, MPH, MS , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Laura A. McClure, MSPH , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Manuel A. Ocasio, BA , Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Stacey L. Tannenbaum, PhD, RD, LD/N , Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
William G. LeBlanc, PhD , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine - NIOSH Research Group, Miami, FL
Cristina A. Fernandez, MSEd , Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Julie Kornfeld, MPH, PhD , Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Kristopher L. Arheart, EdD , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine - NIOSH Research Group, Miami, FL
Lora E. Fleming, MD, PhD , OHH Center & Red Tide Research Group, University of Miami, Key Biscayne, FL
David J. Lee, PhD , Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Introduction: Infection with high-risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been shown to have a strong etiological relationship with cancers of the cervix, head and neck. Current recommendations for HPV vaccination are for 11-26 year old females to receive three doses of HPV vaccine. We investigated HPV vaccine receipt among US adults and also examined correlates of uptake, including sociodemographic indicators and health behaviors.

Methods: Using pooled data from the 20072010 National Health Interview Survey Cancer Control Modules, we assessed factors associated with HPV vaccine receipt and interest in getting the HPV vaccine among adults aged 1849 years. Analyses were adjusted for the pooling of data and the complex sample survey design.

Results: The prevalence of vaccination in those 18-29, 30-39, and 40-49 was 11.48%, 0.72%, and 0.37%, respectively. In multivariable analyses, the uninsured were more likely (OR [95% confidence interval], 1.49 [1.34-1.67]) to report being interested in getting the HPV vaccine. However, the uninsured were less likely (0.40 [0.31-0.51]) to report vaccination. In addition, adults that did not meet the recommended physical activity guidelines were less likely to report ever having the HPV vaccine (0.67 [0.56-0.79]).

Conclusion: Having health insurance is associated with an increased likelihood of HPV vaccination; however, with a demonstrated interest in the vaccine among the uninsured, there is a clear need to provide greater access via no- or low-cost targeted vaccination campaigns.

Learning Areas:
Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs
Advocacy for health and health education
Assessment of individual and community needs for health education
Protection of the public in relation to communicable diseases including prevention or control
Provision of health care to the public
Public health or related organizational policy, standards, or other guidelines

Learning Objectives:
1. Examine HPV vaccine receipt among adults in the US. 2. Identify differences in vaccine uptake by sociodemographic indicators

Keywords: Immunizations, Access to Health Care

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am the qualified first author and research associate on a federally funded grant focusing on the linkage of national health interview surveys and state cancer registries. I am particularly interested in the sociodemographic, built environment, and risk factors that may contribute to the development of HPV-associated cancers.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.

Back to: 4305.0: Cancer Epidemiology 2