269337 Sleep Duration, Shift Work, and Hypertension: Analysis of the National Health Interview Survey

Monday, October 29, 2012

Mirnova Ceide, MD , Department of Psychiatry, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Shavon Dillon, MD , Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Stephanie Thermozier , Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Kennon Weatherhead , Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Jeriann Collymore , Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Adissu Worknah , Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Girardin Jean-Louis, PhD , Professor of Medicine and Psychiatry, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Introduction:The purpose of this study was to investigate whether short sleepers (<6hrs) working the night shift are at greater risk of reporting hypertension and to explore whether race/ethnicity affected those associations.Methods: Analysis was based on the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), providing self-reported work schedule, a diagnosis of hypertension, and estimated habitual sleep durations. A total of 65,919 American adults provided valid data (mean age=46.2 17.7 years; 52.7% were female). The NHIS is a cross-sectional household interview survey utilizing a multistage area probability design. During face-to-face interviews, personnel from the US Census Bureau used computer-assisted personal interviewing. Respondents provided anthropometric and sociodemographic data and information regarding physician-diagnosed chronic conditions. Results: Of the sample, 32.6% reported hypertension; 95.3%, regular daytime schedule and 4.7%, regular night shift. Logistic regression analysis indicated that black night shift-workers were at higher risk of reporting hypertension than blacks who reported working a daytime schedule [OR=1.16, 95%CI: 1.15-1.16; p<0.001]. Adjusted analyses showed white and black short sleepers working the night shift had a higher risk of hypertension than day shift-workers [OR=1.39, 95%CI: 1.39-1.39; OR=1.72, 95%CI: 1.71-1.73; p<0.001]. Analyses showed short sleepers working the night shift were 22% more likely to report hypertension [OR=1.22, 95%CI: 1.22-1.23; p<0.001]. Analyses also showed that black short sleepers working the night shift were at considerably greater risk than their white counterparts [OR=1.96, 95%CI: 1.95-1.97; p<0.001]. Conclusion: Short sleepers who reported working the night shift may be at increased risk of having hypertension. Black short sleepers may be at relatively greater risk.

Learning Areas:
Diversity and culture
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs
Public health or related organizational policy, standards, or other guidelines
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
1. Evaluate the risk of developing hypertension in short sleepers who work the night shift. 2. Identify the association between race, ethnicity, sleep and hypertension. 3. Determine if the risk of hypertension is greater among blacks.

Keywords: Workforce, Hypertension

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified to present because I participated in the design, data analysis, interpretation and final write up.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.