269592 Exploring patterns of sexual behavior and relationship factors on consistent condom use among U.S. young adult males

Tuesday, October 30, 2012 : 12:50 PM - 1:10 PM

Tia Zeno, MPH , Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
Hee-Soon Juon, PhD , Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
David Holtgrave, PhD , Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
Hayley Mark, PhD, MPH, RN , Community Public Health, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD
Freya Sonenstein, PhD , Center for Adolescent Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
Janice Bowie, PhD, MPH , Department of Health, Behavior & Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
Background: The prevention of teen pregnancy has long been the focus of intervention research; however, young adults are a group just as vulnerable to the consequences of unprotected sex. This study examined the associations of patterns of sexual behavior (PSB) and relationship factors (RF) on consistent condom use over the past four weeks and past 12 months among U.S. young adult males. Methods: Using data from the 2006-2008 cycle of the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), respondents consisted of 2,010 males between 18-29 years of age who reported sex with a female in the past year and were not currently trying to get pregnant. Regression analyses were used to examine associations of PSB (age at sex debut, contraceptive use at first sex, number of biological children, and pregnancy status) and RF (contraceptive use at last sex, number of female partners, partner race and age) on consistent condom use, adjusting for age, marital status, race/ethnicity, work status and educational level. Results: With exception of age at sex debut, bivariate analyses found significant associations for all predictors on both outcomes. Age at sex debut, pregnancy status, and contraceptive use at last sex remained significant in multivariate analyses at both time-points. Conclusion: Prior condom use was found to be a major antecedent of consistent condom use among this sample. Promoting condoms as both an effective family planning and disease prevention strategy may have a greater impact on use, particularly among members of this age group who report not wanting an unplanned pregnancy.

Learning Areas:
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
Identify predictors of consistent condom use among young adult males using data from the 2006-2008 cycle of the NSFG. Describe the benefits and challenges of conducting male-focused reproductive health research through the use of cross-sectional data.

Keywords: Male Health, Condom Use

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health student who is using this data for dissertation research.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.