269669 Association of Social Desirability with Sleep Disturbance(s) among the Black Population

Monday, October 29, 2012

Sidrah Mahmud , Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Nabanita Bhunia , Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Abhishek Pandey, MD , Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Mirnova Ciede, MD , Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Shivon Dillon, MD , Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
George Casimir , Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate, Brooklyn NY
Ferdinand Zizi, MBA , Clinical Instructor of Medicine and Neurology, Program Director, Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Girardin Jean-Louis, PhD , Professor of Medicine and Psychiatry, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Introduction : Despite a higher prevalence of sleep disturbance among blacks, they are least likely to report sleep complaints. In this study, we examined whether the reporting sleep-related problems is associated with degree of social desirability.

Methods : Data was obtained from a larger study (MetSO) investigating OSA treatment among metabolic syndrome patients in the primary-care setting. A total of 60 patients were interviewed, providing data on insomnia complaints, namely difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep, excessive daytime sleepiness, and daytime napping. Social Desirability was assessed with the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale. Analyses were performed using SPSS 19.0

Results : The mean age was 60.9 13.8 years; 75% were female. Of the sample, 92.3% were diagnosed with hypertension, 58.9% with diabetes, 77.8% with dyslipidemia, and 88.2% were overweight/obese. The mean Social Desirability Score was 20.45 4.45. The mean total sleep time was 5.65 1.6 hours; 48.3% reported daytime sleepiness, 40.0% had difficulty falling asleep, 45% had difficulty staying asleep, and 40.0% took naps during the day. Univariate analysis showed that individuals reporting daytime napping had low social desirability scores (21.83 4.93 vs. 19.00 4.08; t(48) = -2.220, p=0.031).

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that blacks reporting daytime napping are characterized by lower levels of social desirability. Inadequate statistical power might explain why other sleep measures did not show significant differences. A sample size of 200 individuals would be required to detect true differences in the population. Future studies should examine other sleep factors affected by social desirability.

Learning Areas:
Chronic disease management and prevention
Diversity and culture
Epidemiology
Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs
Public health or related education
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
1)To define the correlation between social desirability and the reporting of sleep disturbances among the black population. 2)To analyze factors contributing to increased social desirability and its effect on sleep disturbances among the black population as compared to other racial/ethnic groups. 3) To discuss means of encouraging the reporting of sleep disturbances in the black population to promote accurate diagnosis, management and treatment.

Keywords: African American, Health Disparities

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am currently a third year medical student at SUNY Downstate Medical Center and pursuing research in the field of sleep medicine and health disparities to promote awareness of public health issues.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.