270262 Prevalence of comorbid depression and anxiety with increased BMI in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes

Monday, October 29, 2012

Kara Morrison, BA , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC
Alethea Amponsah, BA BS , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston Salem, NC
Maria Isabel Rego, BA , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston Salem, NC
Erica Sickelbaugh, BS, BS , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, High Point, NC
Madeleine Langr , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC
Hyunseung Lee , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC
Leonardo Tjahjono , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC
David Mount, PsyD, MA , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC
Background: Although research has documented the association between Diabetes and depression/anxiety, it is presently unknown if uncontrolled T2DM along with comorbid depression/anxiety is associated with an increased body mass index (BMI). Objective: To determine whether Comorbid Depression and Anxiety in patients with Type 2 Diabetes increased BMI. Methods: Data was obtained through a retrospective chart review analyzed for the presence of a diagnosis or health care provider note confirming a history of depression and/or anxiety. BMI categories were calculated based on patient's weight and height and then categories for BMI were separated between classes. Patient BMI scores were considered obese at >30. Results: Patients (n=124) were predominantly female (77%) African Americans (61%), between 26 and 65 years of age (SD 9.66, Mean=51). Forty-five percent of participants had a history of Depression, 35% had a history of Anxiety and 81% had uncontrolled diabetes (A1C>7.1%). Among those with depression 51% were female, 84% were obese and 54% were between the ages of 41-55. Among participants with anxiety 38% were obese, 40% were female and 42% were 25-40 years of age. Conclusion: From the preliminary findings of this study we conclude more investigation is necessary to determine the relationship of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and increased BMI as predictors for adverse neurocognitive health since the prevalence of all these factors still remain high, especially among a population of females.

Learning Areas:
Advocacy for health and health education

Learning Objectives:
To determine the prevalence of comorbid depression and anxiety in patients with type 2 diabetes and increased BMI.

Keywords: Diabetes, Depression

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have participated in this research study by implementing of data collection, quality check, and dissemination of findings.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.

Back to: 3291.0: Psychiatric epidemiology