270427 Parental occupation in a heavily polluted industry and respiratory status of children in Greece

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Athena Linos, MD, PhD, MPH , Institute of Preventive Medicine Environmental and Occupational Health Prolepsis, Marousi - Athens, Greece
Eleni Papadimitriou, MD, PhD , Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Athens, Greece
Athanasios Petralias, PhD , Institute of Preventive Medicine, Environmental and Occupational Health-Prolepsis, Athens, Greece
Leonidas Pililitsis, MD , Medical School National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Athens, Greece
Eirini Saranti-Papasaranti, MSc , Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Athens, Greece
Elena Riza, MD PhD , Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, Athens, Greece
Purpose: To compare asthma frequency and respiratory outcomes in two cohorts of children: one whose parents worked at heavily polluted industries and another whose parents reported non-industrial employment. Methods: 104 elementary school children participated in the study. We included children living in Oinofyta, (heavy industrial area including mining, chemical and leather production, pharmaceuticals, detergents, pesticides production, food and fodders production) and children living in Makrakoni (control rural area, most residents employed in agriculture and livestock). Parents completed a detailed questionnaire on their occupation and the health of their children and children underwent physical exam and a spirometry test. Results: Asthma and respiratory outcomes were more prevalent in children whose parents worked in industry. Specifically, hospitalization due to asthma (16,3% vs 13,1%), as well as asthmatic episodes(4,7% vs 1,6%), bronchitis (11,6% vs 8,2%) and dry cough in the previous 12 months (9,3% vs 8,2%) were more prevalent, compared with children whose parents reported an non-industrial occupation. Low Forced Vital Capacity (FVC <90%) was associated with paternal industrial occupation (P=0,05, OR: 2,36, 95% CI: 1,00-5,60). A borderline significant association between at least mother's or father's industrial employment and the child's abnormal spirometric curve performance was also found (p=0,09, OR: 2,19, 95% CI: 0,83-5,80). After controlling for potential confounders, a history of asthma diagnosis was more prevalent in children whose mothers reported industrial employment (p=0,11, OR: 9,47). Conclusion: Parents industrial occupation and industrial area were adversely associated with children's respiratory status.

Learning Areas:
Occupational health and safety

Learning Objectives:
To compare the respiratory status of children whose parents work in a heavily polluted industrial occupation compared to children whose parents work in agriculture.

Keywords: Occupational Health, Asthma

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I designed this study, supervised data collection, data analysis and synthesis of the results and writing of the abstract.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.