271347 A meta-analysis of obesity-prevention interventions among Latinos in the US and Latin America

Monday, October 29, 2012

Noe C. Crespo, PhD, MPH, MS , School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, Exercise and Wellness Program, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ
Christina M. Eisenberg, MPH , Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
Christina K. Holub, PhD, MPH , Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
Elva M. Arredondo, PhD , Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
Simon Barquera, MD, PhD, MS , Nutrition and Health Research Center, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico
Luz Maria Sanchez, MD, MS , Nutrition and Health Research Center, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico
John P. Elder, PhD, MPH , Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
Background: Obesity disproportionally affects Latinos. Effective strategies are needed to address this disparity. Little is know about the factors that predict success. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted of obesity prevention intervention studies among Latinos in the US and Latin America. Various search terms and inclusion criteria were applied, and relevant studies were abstracted. Standardized effect size (Cohen's d) was calculated, and the quality of studies was rated. ANCOVA tested for effect size differences based on several study characteristics, adjusting for study quality. Results: Initially, 326 studies were included and 105 studies met the final criteria for abstraction. Of these, 80 studies had enough information to calculate effect size. Forty-two studies were from the US, 19 from Mexico, 15 from Brazil, 3 from Chile, and 1 from Venezuela. Effect sizes ranged from -1.42 to 1.74 with a mean of 0.28 SD 0.57. Effect size did not statistically differ based on the country of the study (US = 0.27 0.60 vs. non-US = 0.29 0.53), age-group (Child-only = 0.11 0.61 vs. Adult-only = 0.39 0.55 vs. Child/Adult = 0.28 0.37), or behavioral target/approach (PA-only = 0.15 0.65, Health Education-only = 0.35 0.78 vs. PA/HE = 0.29 0.48). Neither quality of study execution, design strength, or overall quality score were correlated with effect size. Conclusions: Effect sizes vary greatly, and it is unclear what factors relate to effect size among studies in Latinos. Further analyses are warranted to explore factors that influence effect size.

Learning Areas:
Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
Compare and summarize effect sizes across studies. Evaluate the effectiveness of obesity prevention interventions among Latinos.

Keywords: Latino Health, Obesity

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have conducted extensive research on the topic of health disparities and Latino health. Specifically, I have conducted community-based and family-based behavioral interventions to prevent obesity among Latinos.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.