271444 Does the rate of mental health issues increase with age in a group of patients with type 2 diabetes: Preliminary findings from the North Carolina Neurocognition Risk Reduction Diabetes Study

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Ashley Jackson , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
Kara Morrison, BA , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC
Maria Isabel Rego, BA , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston Salem, NC
Erica Sickelbaugh, BS, BS , Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Winston Salem, NC
Alethea Amponsah, BA BS , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston Salem, NC
Madeleine Langr , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC
Hyunseung Lee , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC
Leonardo Tjahjono , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC
David Mount, PsyD, MA , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC
Introduction: Research has linked type 2 diabetes with increased depression and anxiety. Although there have been reports showing increased depression and anxiety in middle-aged women, currently no knowledge indicates whether depression and anxiety increases with age among patients with type 2 diabetes. Objective: To determine whether the prevalence of depression and anxiety increased with age in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Data abstracted via retrospective chart review from an Academic Medical setting determined presence of a diagnosis or health care provider note confirming history of depression and anxiety. The data was coded into three age groups: 26-40, 41-55, and 56-65 years. Results: Patients (n=124) were primarily African American (61%) females (77%), between 26-65 years of age (SD 9.66, Mean=51). In the 25-40 range, 21% had both depression and anxiety, 42.1% had a history of anxiety and 31.6% a history of depression. In the 41-55 range, 28.3% had a history of both, 33.3% a history of anxiety and 54.2% a history of depression. In the 56-65 range, 24.4% had a history of both, 33.3% a history of anxiety and 37.8% a history of depression. Conclusion: Depression was more common in patients 41-55 years old; anxiety was more common in the 25-40 year range. Depression and anxiety can affect diabetes self-management, and poor diabetes self-management can increase risk for health related complications including neurocognitive impairment. Addressing mental health issues among adults with type 2 diabetes can improve diabetes management which may result in a decreased risk for neurocognitive impairment.

Learning Areas:
Chronic disease management and prevention
Epidemiology

Learning Objectives:
Analyze the rates of depression and anxiety among 3 different age groups with type 2 diabetes.

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I helped with data abstraction, data quality check and also was a co-author in the abstract.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.