272751 Pregnant Women HIV Testing in Managua: The road to Elimination of Mother-to-Child Transmission

Monday, October 29, 2012

Jonathan Colasanti, MD , Department of Medicine / Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami, Miami, FL
Karina Lifschitz, BA , Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology / Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Lisa Metsch, PhD , Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Daniel Feaster, PhD , Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami, Miami, FL
Margaret R. Pereyra, DrPH , Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Background: The Pan American Health Organization's (PAHO) goal to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV by 2015 calls for HIV testing rates among pregnant women greater than 95%. Feminization of the Nicaraguan HIV epidemic highlights HIV testing in pregnancy as a first step in prevention of mother-to-child transmission. Data regarding HIV testing rates in pregnant women within Managua are not published. We characterize this for a single Managua health district (District 6.1). Methods: A retrospective epidemiological review of aggregate data from the Managua public health department assessed HIV testing rates among pregnant women in District 6.1 and citywide from January 2010 December 2011. Results: In Managua, 41.30% of 18,922 pregnant women attending prenatal clinic visits at health centers in 2010 received an HIV test. Twenty-seven pregnant women in Managua were found to be HIV positive, 0.17% of those who were tested. Comparisons between 2010 and 2011 in District 6.1 reflect an increase in women who received an HIV test from 24.23% in 2010 to 49.31% in 2011. This increase was statistically significant (p < 0.001) and has a moderate effect size (phi = 0.26). Two pregnant women were HIV positive in 2010 and three in 2011 in District 6.1. This indicates 0.32% and 0.13% of pregnant women tested in 2010 and 2011, respectively, were HIV positive. Conclusions: HIV testing rates from 2010 to 2011 improved in pregnant women yet remain below PAHO's goal. Therefore interventions are needed across Managua to increase the HIV testing rates of pregnant women.

Learning Areas:
Epidemiology
Provision of health care to the public

Learning Objectives:
Describe the current situation of HIV testing in pregnant women in Managua, Nicaragua. Demonstrate a need for innovative programs to increase HIV testing rates among pregnant women in Managua, Nicaragua.

Keywords: HIV/AIDS, International Public Health

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I was the principal investigator, and conducted all data collection, data analysis and paper writing related to the current study being presented.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.

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