273239 Differences in self-reported cataract prevalence and cataract surgery by race and ethnicity in the United States, 2008

Monday, October 29, 2012 : 9:15 AM - 9:30 AM

Chiu-Fang Chou, Dr PH , The Vision Health Initiative, Division of Diabetes Translation/The Ginn Group, Northrop Grumman Corporation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Xinzhi Zhang , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
John E. Crews, DPA , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Jinan B. Saaddine, MD, MPH , National Vision Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Objectives: To examine the association between race/ethnicity and cataract/cataract surgery prevalence in the United States. Method: We used data from 13,681 adults aged 40 years and older in the 2008 National Health Interview Survey. Having cataract prevalence and cataract surgery was self-reported. Multivariate logistic regressions were conducted to estimate odds ratios using Stata 12.1. We considered statistically significant differences at p<0.05. Results: The prevalence of self-reported cataracts was highest for non-Hispanic whites (19.0%), followed by non-Hispanic blacks (12.4%), and Hispanics (10.1%). Among those reporting ever having had cataracts, 58% of non-Hispanic whites, 49% of non-Hispanic blacks, and 61% of Hispanics reported having had cataract surgery. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, the age, sex, diabetes status adjusted odds of having cataracts were significantly lower for non-Hispanic blacks (OR=0.66; 95%CI=0.550.79), and Hispanics (OR=0.62; 95%CI=0.480.79). After controlling for age, sex, educational attainment, income poverty ratio, marital status, and health insurance, non-Hispanic blacks (OR=0.60; 95%CI=0.450.77) were significantly less likely to have cataract surgery than non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions: Racial and ethnic disparities exist in cataract prevalence and cataract surgery among U.S. adults. Improving health education and eye care access among racial/ethnic minorities is warranted to reduce the disparities in the utilization of cataract surgery and to decrease the burden of visual impairment associate with cataract in the U.S.

Learning Areas:
Epidemiology
Public health or related public policy

Learning Objectives:
1. Describe the prevalence of self-reported cataract, cataract surgery, and vision loss due to cataract. 2. Evaluate whether the race/ethnicity differs in cataract, cataract surgery, and vision loss due to cataract. 3. Demonstrate how to use National Health Interview Survey to conduct the studies related to vision health.

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have conducted several studies on the epidemiology and health services researches of eye disease and vision health. Among my scientific interests has been the development of strategies for preventing visual impairment among US population.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.