274252 Disparities in tobacco smoke exposure by sexual orientation: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2001-2010

Tuesday, October 30, 2012 : 5:30 PM - 5:50 PM

Manuel A. Ocasio, BA , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Alberto J. Caban-Martinez, PhD, DO, MPH, CPH , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine - NIOSH Research Group, Miami, FL
Taghrid Asfar, MD , Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Tulay Koru-Sengul, MHS, PhD , Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Kristopher L. Arheart, EdD , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine - NIOSH Research Group, Miami, FL
Lora E. Fleming, MD, PhD , European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter Medical School, Truro, United Kingdom
Tainya C. Clarke, MPH, MS , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
S. Bryn Austin, ScD , Division of Adolescent/Young Adult Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA
David J. Lee, PhD , Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Background: In the US, the tobacco industry has increased marketing efforts targeting the lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) communities, utilizing nightclub/bar promotions and event sponsorships among other strategies to increase visibility and promote the use of their products. Despite these inequalities in tobacco marketing and the three-fold smoking rates observed in LBG individuals as compared to heterosexuals in small population-based studies, limited research has been devoted to examining national self-reported and biologically-confirmed estimates of tobacco exposure. Methods: We pooled and analyzed data on 14,940 US adults ages 20-59 (representing an annual 5.2 million LGB adults) from the nationally representative 2001-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) who responded to questions about sexual orientation, smoking status, and had serum cotinine information. Results: Compared to heterosexuals, LGB adults had a significantly lower proportion of self-reported never-smokers (42.52.5% vs. 53.10.5%) and a significantly higher proportion of current smokers (38.92.4 vs. 26.40.4). No significant differences in secondhand smoke (SHS) (confirmed by serum cotinine) exposure were observed between LGB and heterosexuals. In a subgroup analysis of LGB adults, 34.0% of males and 42.8% of females were self-reported current smokers. There were, however, no statistically significant differences in self-reported smoking status by gender. Conclusions: The significantly smaller proportion of never-smoker LGB adults suggests that these sexual minorities engage in tobacco use more than heterosexuals. Additional surveillance efforts for LGB smokers are needed to further examine disparities in tobacco exposure and to inform the development of tailored tobacco control interventions.

Learning Areas:
Epidemiology
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
Compare the prevalence of primary and secondhand smoke exposure between lesbian, gay and bisexual-identified and heterosexual-identified individuals. Describe, for the first time, nationally-representative primary and secondhand smoke exposure prevalence estimates for lesbian, gay and bisexual-identified individuals.

Keywords: Tobacco Control, Sexuality

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am a a Masters student in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health and work in tobacco control research utilizing large, nationally-representative datasets.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.