141st APHA Annual Meeting and Exposition

In This section

287983
Health related quality of life in adults with COPD: Who is still smoking and where can public health and clinical medicine intervene?

Wednesday, November 6, 2013 : 1:32 PM - 1:50 PM

Dana Mowls, MPH , Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, OK
Melissa Zullo, PhD , Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Kent State University College of Public Health, Kent, OH
Vinay Cheruvu, PhD , Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Kent State University College of Public Health, Kent, OH
Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major component of care. HRQOL can be impacted by exacerbations. Exacerbations can be reduced through smoking cessation. Identifying smokers with COPD and describing HRQOL and utilization will assist practitioners with avenues for intervention. This research described HRQOL in smokers/non-smoker and identified factors associated with smoking and avenues for intervention in adults with COPD diagnosed by a breathing test.

This was a cross-sectional study using 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data. Weighted multivariable logistic regression examined: 1) HRQOL in current vs. former smokers and 2) factors associated with smoking and opportunities for intervention in adults with COPD and diagnostic breathing test.

Forty-nine percent of adults were former smokers. Current smokers were more likely to report fair/poor general health (odds ratio (OR): 1.30; confidence interval (CI): 1.05-1.61), and ≥14 days of poor mental (OR: 1.80; CI: 1.42-2.29) or physical health (OR: 1.29; CI: 1.05-1.58) and social functioning (OR: 1.52; CI: 1.21-1.90). Those who were divorced/separated/widowed (OR=1.4; CI: 1.1-1.7) or never married (OR=1.5, CI: 1.0-2.2) or reported depression (OR=1.4; CI: 1.1-1.7) were more likely to be current smokers. Those with a personal doctor (OR=0.48; CI: 0.32-0.71) and who had seen a doctor about shortness of breath (OR=0.77; CI: 0.63-0.94) were less likely to be current smokers.

Current smokers have worse HRQOL and are less likely to have healthcare utilization when compared to former smokers indicating a need for public health interventions outside the clinical system.

Learning Areas:
Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs
Chronic disease management and prevention
Epidemiology
Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
Demonstrate the importance of a diagnostic breathing test in current smokers with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

Keywords: Smoking, Chronic Diseases

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: As an assitant epidemiologist at a local health department, I have seen the disease burden of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and the need for public health intervention. My research at Kent State University involves improving upon the Health Related Quality of life and disease progression of persons diagnosed with COPD.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.