141st APHA Annual Meeting

In This section

292517
Lifestyle change initiative 2012: Support needed to shift to a nutrient-dense, whole food, plant-based dietary pattern on a college campus

Monday, November 4, 2013 : 9:30 AM - 9:50 AM

Wendy Moore , Department of Health and Wellness, University of North Carolina Asheville, Asheville, NC
Sarah Tindall , Department of Health and Wellness, University of North Carolina Asheville, Asheville, NC
Jason Wingert, PhD , Department of Health and Wellness, University of North Carolina Asheville, Asheville, NC
Keith Ray, EdD , Department of Health and Wellness, University of North Carolina Asheville, Asheville, NC
Amy Joy Lanou, PhD , Department of Health and Wellness, University of North Carolina Asheville, Asheville, NC
Whole food, plant-based diets (WFPB) promote weight loss, reverse type 2 diabetes and heart disease. A 6-week randomized trial with a 3-month follow-up tested the effectiveness of two levels of support for adopting a WFPB diet on a university campus. Healthy adults were randomly assigned into 2 treatment groups (SUPP; n=13 and INFO; n=13) and compared to an untreated control (CON; n =11). SUPP was given weekly group coaching sessions, nutrition information, email/phone support, and 2 cooking classes. INFO was given the same nutrition information and email support only. Food records and measures of blood pressure, weight, and % body fat were collected from all participants at baseline, 6-weeks and at follow-up. SUPP complied with the dietary parameters WFPB on 81.4% of the days vs. 74.9% for INFO. Macronutrient pattern improved for SUPP with significant increases in fiber and percent of calories from carbohydrate and with decreases in total fat, protein, and total calories (p<0.05). Similarly, INFO group had significant increases in percent of calories from carbohydrate and significant decreases in percent calories from fat, total calories, total fat and saturated fat (p<0.05). Weight loss (lb) was significantly greater for both SUPP (-4.183.66; p< 0.01) and INFO (-1.93 2.2; p = 0.02) than CON (+0.182.19). Shifting to a WFPB diet resulted in a healthier nutrient profile as compared to baseline, even as total calorie intake decreased (SUPP 431.95238.92 kcal; INFO 534.50550.12 kcal; p<0.05). Both treatment groups were successful, but weekly support meetings improved compliance, dietary nutrient adequacy, and weight loss.

Learning Areas:
Chronic disease management and prevention

Learning Objectives:
Describe how a simple program for dietary change can be effectively implemented on a college campus. Evaluate the benefits of a lifestyle change initiative for promoting healthy weight and nutrient dense eating patterns.

Keywords: Students, Behavior Modification

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am senior in Health and Wellness Promotion at University of North Carolina Asheville and I have completed a certification in plant-based nutrition through e-Cornell. I conducted this study with the support of another student and 3 faculty members as my undergraduate research project in health and wellness. I plan to do graduate work in nutritional epidemiology next year.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.