The 131st Annual Meeting (November 15-19, 2003) of APHA

The 131st Annual Meeting (November 15-19, 2003) of APHA

4185.0: Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - 3:40 PM

Abstract #72590

Relationship between depressive symptoms and smoking status among urban adolescents

Carolyn Agurcia, MA1, Paul Cinciripini, PhD2, Steven H Kelder, PhD, MPH3, and Alexander V. Prokhorov, MD, PhD2. (1) Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, UT-Houston School of Public Health, 7000 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, 713--500-9678, Carolyn.A.Agurcia@uth.tmc.edu, (2) Department of Behavioral Sciences, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, HMB 3.063.11, Houston, TX 77030, (3) School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, 7000 Fannin, Suite 2658, Houston, TX 77030

Introduction: The relationship between adolescent depression and smoking tobacco is an important yet poorly understood factor in adolescent smoking behavior. We examined the relationship between symptoms of depression and tobacco use in a sample of urban adolescents. Methods: Data derived from the first wave of a longitudinal study of tobacco prevention and cessation using an interactive CD-ROM program (ASPIRE). Predominantly 10th grade adolescents completed a self-administered questionnaire that included questions on depressive symptoms (CES-DC) and current use of cigarettes. Demographics: The sample (n=1447) consisted of 58.5% females, mean age of 15.67 years ( .91). The self reported race/ethnicity was 57.5% Hispanics, 35.4% African Americans, 3.4% Caucasians and 3.7% other race/ethnicity. Current smoking status was reported as follows: 89.4% (n=1215) nonsmokers, 3.8% (n=51) former smokers and 6.8% (n=93) current smokers. Results: 27.1% (n=371) showed a moderate level of depressive symptoms evidenced by CES-DC (scores from 15-23) and 31.3% (429) of the total sample scores showed a high level of depressive symptoms (scores >=24). The proportion of former smokers, current smokers and non-smokers scoring in the moderate range (15-23) was 31.3% 30.3% and 26.8% respectively (2 = 11.2, p <.05. Additionally, the proportion of former smokers, current smokers and non-smokers scoring in the high range (>=24) was 39.6%, 41.6% and 30.3% respectively (2 = 6.4, p <.05). Conclusions: The evidence suggests that current and former smokers are more likely to experience depressive symptomtology, in comparison to nonsmokers. These rates are higher than expected in adolescent populations. Further analyses will evaluate these results.

Learning Objectives:

Keywords: Depression, Tobacco

Presenting author's disclosure statement:
I do not have any significant financial interest/arrangement or affiliation with any organization/institution whose products or services are being discussed in this session.

ASPIRE: A CD ROM-Based Smoking Prevention and Cessation Curriculum for Urban Youth

The 131st Annual Meeting (November 15-19, 2003) of APHA