182168 Disclosure of HPV test results to sexual partners and other preventive behaviors among males tested for HPV

Monday, October 27, 2008: 3:10 PM

Cheryl A. Vamos, MPH , Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Ellen Daley, PhD, MPH , Community and Family Health, University of South Florida College of Public Health, Tampa, FL
Eric R. Buhi, MPH, PhD, CHES , College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Erica Hesch Anstey, MA, CLC , Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Karen Dyer, MA, MPH , Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Stephanie K. Kolar, MSPH , Community and Family Health, University of South Florida College of Public Health, Tampa, FL
Background:

HPV affects >20 million people and is the most common STI in the U.S. Despite its high prevalence, males typically have not played a role in HPV education/prevention because there is no routine screening test available for them. It is unknown whether males would disclose their test result to sexual partners and participate in other preventative behaviors post HPV-diagnosis.

Purpose:

To examine whether males disclosed their HPV status and disseminated HPV-related information to their sexual partners.

Methods:

Males enrolled in a cognitive and emotional response to an HPV-diagnosis study completed a computer-assisted-survey instrument (CASI) that assessed their health behaviors post-diagnosis. Items regarding HPV disclosure, education and recommendation practices were tabulated.

Results:

Of males who had a main partner (n=64), 80% disclosed their test results; they also informed their partner that HPV is sexually transmitted (32%), HPV could be passed to them (28%), HPV causes genital warts (24%), and HPV causes cervical cancer (25%). Forty-two percent of males suggested Pap smear screening to their main partner. Ninety-three percent of males reported that they were likely/very likely to get vaccinated if the vaccine were available to males. Ninety-five percent and 93% of males responded that they would be likely/very likely to vaccinate their current/future daughter and son, respectively.

Conclusion:

The majority of males disclosed their HPV test results; however, less than one-third disclosed HPV-related information to their partners. Disclosing STI status, discussing consequences of unsafe sex and promoting preventative sexual practices are important in decreasing HPV-associated morbidity.

Learning Objectives:
1. To determine whether men disclose their test results post-HPV diagnosis. 2. To examine whether and to what extent men discuss consequences of HPV and promote preventative sexual practices. 3. To understand menís role in both primary and secondary preventative HPV behaviors.

Keywords: Cervical Cancer, Prevention

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am a Research Associate on this study.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.