196699 A longitudinal study of the relationships between township-level characteristics and teen birth rates in Taiwan

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Ying-Chih Chuang, PHD , Graduate Institute of Public Health, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
Wei-Wei Hung, BPH , Graduate Institute of Public Health, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
The influence of a place on adolescent health behaviors has received increasing research attention. The argument has been that there are contextual processes operating at the scale of communities or other geographical areas, which are responsible for health inequality. However, few studies have examined the contextual effects on health in a longitudinal data set. This study used township-level data and a pooled ecological design with repeated measures to examine the relationships between contextual characteristics and birth rates to teens aged 15-19. Data were extracted from Taiwan census data and Health and Vital Statistics in the year of 1980, 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, and 2005 (N=2154). Contextual characteristics included the percentage of residents with a college degree, the percentage of divorced/separated, the percentage of residents older than 65, the percentage of aborigines, residential mobility, and urbanization. We used two-level mixed models in which years are nested within towns and cities. Contemporary and time-lagged covariates were modeled. In the contemporary model, a lower percentage of residents with a college degree, a higher percentage of residents older than 65, a higher percentage of aborigines, and a lower level of urbanization were associated with increased teen birth rates. Results of the 5-year and 10-year time-lagged models both showed that a lower percentage of divorced/separated, a lower percentage of residents with a college degree, a higher percentage of aborigines, and a lower level of urbanization were associated with increased teen birth rates, suggesting that minority composition, community education level, urbanization, and local community norms toward marriage and family determined teen birth rates.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Analyze the effects of township-level characteristics on teen birth rates using mixed statistical models (2) Assess the five-year and ten-year time-lagged effects of township-level characteristics on teen birth rates

Keywords: Social Inequalities, Adolescent Health

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: Currently I am an assistant professor in the Graduate Institute of Public Health, Taipei Medical Univerisity. I obtained my Ph.D. in the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My publications are as follows: (1)Yu-Sheng Li and Ying-Chih Chuang*. Neighborhood Effects on an Individualís Health using Neighborhood Measurements Developed by Factor Analysis and Cluster Analysis. Journal of Urban Health, accepted (2)Ying-Chih Chuang* and Kun-Yang Chuang. Gender Differences in the Relationship between Social Capital and Smoking and Drinking Behavior in Taiwan. Social Science and Medicine, 67, 1321-1330, 2008 (3)Kun-Yang Chuang, Ying-Chih Chuang, Liang-Ju Chen, Shwu Chong Wu. Geographical Variations in Elderly Disability in Taiwan. Journal of Nursing Research, 16, 1, 47-54, 2008 (4)Ying-Chih Chuang*, Yu-Sheng Li, Yi-Hua Wu, and Hsing Jasming Chao. A Multilevel Analysis of Neighborhood and Individual Effects on Individual Smoking and Drinking in Taiwan. BMC Public Health, 7, 151, 2007 (5)Ying-Chih Chuang*, Susan T. Ennett, Karl E. Bauman, & Vangie A. Foshee. Neighborhood Influences on Adolescent Cigarette and Alcohol Use: Mediating Effects through Parent and Peer characteristics, Journal o f Health and Social Behavior, 46, 187-204, 2005. (6)Ying-Chih Chuang*, Catherine Cubbin, David Ahn, & Marilyn A. Winkleby. Effects of Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status and Convenience Store Concentration on Individual-level Smoking, Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 59, 568-573, 2005 (7)Susan T Ennett*, Karl E. Bauman, Michael Pemberton, Vangie A. Foshee, Ying-Chih Chuang, Tonya S. King, & Gary R. Koch. Mediation in a Family-Directed Program for Prevention of Adolescent Tobacco and Alcohol Use, Preventive Medicine, 33(4), 333-346, 2001 (8)Ying-Chih Chuang. Neighborhood Influences on Adolescent Cigarette and Alcohol Use, Doctoral Dissertation, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2001
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.