198174 GoodNEWS Trial (Genes, Nutrition, Exercise, Wellness and Spiritual Growth): Components and Preliminary Findings

Tuesday, November 10, 2009: 9:12 AM

Mark J. DeHaven, Ph D , Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
Jenny J. Lee, MPH, PhD , Department of Health Science, Columbus State University, Columbus, GA
Nora Gimpel, MD , Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
Jo Ann Carson, PhD, RD, LD , Clinical Nutrition, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
James DeLemos, MD , Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
Sue Pickens, MEd , Strategic Planning, Parkland Hospital, Dallas, TX
Maria Ramos-Roman, MD , Division of Endocrinology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
Rev. Chris Simmons, MTh , Cornerstone Baptist Church, Dallas, TX
Tiffany Powell, MD , Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
Kamakki Banks, MD , Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
Natalia Gutierrez-Chefchis, MD , Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
Elicia Williams - King, MD , Department of General Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
The GoodNEWS Project is a community-based participatory research (CBPR) project between UT Southwestern Medical Center and twenty eight (28) African-American congregations in Dallas, Texas. Pilot studies were completed in 2005 with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and a five-year National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) randomized clinical trial was initiated in September 2007, testing the effects of the collaboration on increasing physical activity, reducing saturated fat intake, and modifying other risk factors for heart disease HDL, LDL, HgA1c, BMI and blood pressure. Baseline data from October 2008, indicate that most of the study participants (n=396) have desirable levels of total cholesterol (72.2%), optimal (40.1%) or near optimal (25%) LDL levels, and normal (74.2%) triglycerides, while one-half (48.7%) have low HDL levels. Additionally, most participants have prehypertension (42.9%) or hypertension (21.7%) and the vast majority are obese (67.1%). Participants reported substantially higher levels of disease than national averages for African-American adults: heart disease (9.3%), diabetes (15.3%), high cholesterol (36.3%), and high blood pressure (47.5%). Women were significantly more likely to be sedentary than men (p<.0001; 7-day physical activity recall [PAR]) but men were more likely to eat a diet high in saturated fats than women (p<.01; Diet History Questionnaire [DHQ]). Eating a high saturated fat diet was also related to younger age (p<.0001), being employed (p=.006), smoking (p=.005), and being obese (p<.0001). The study findings and implications will be discussed within the context of the faith-health disease prevention model being developed by the GoodNEWS collaborators.

Learning Objectives:
Describe the components of a multidimensional lifestyle enhancement program conducted in the faith community. Discuss the preliminary outcomes of a five-year clinical trial designed to reduce risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Explain two study findings in the context of community-based disease prevention programs in faith communities.

Keywords: Community-Based Health Promotion, Faith Community

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am the principal investigator on this NIH National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute 5-year clinical trial, and a CBPR researcher with 15 years experience working in the faith-based setting.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.