206898 Motivating Texas Rio Grande Valley Parents to remove the TV from their 2nd grade child's bedroom via Motivational Enhancement Interviews

Wednesday, November 11, 2009: 9:15 AM

Kelli Drenner, PhD , The Michael & Susan Dell Center for Advancement of Healthy Living, University of Texas - Houston School of Public Health, Houston, TX
Steve Kelder, PhD , Michael & Susan Dell Center for Advancement of Healthy Living, The University of Texas School of Public Health, Austin, TX
Andrew E. Springer, DrPH , Michael & Susan Dell Center for Advancement of Healthy Living, University of Texas School of Public Health, Austin, TX
Ross Shegog, PhD , Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston, Houston, TX
Cristina Barroso, DrPH , Division of Behavioral Sciences, School of Public Health, Brownsville, TX
Carolyn Agurcia-Parker, MA , The Michael & Susan Dell Center for Advancement of Healthy Living, University of Texas - Houston School of Public Health, Houston, TX
Deanna Hoelscher, PhD, RD, LD, CNS , The Michael and Susan Dell Center for Advancement of Healthy Living, The University of Texas School of Public Health, Austin, TX
Background:

Television viewing is a sedentary behavior that is modifiable. Reducing media-related behaviors via school-based parent-focused interventions may hold promise for decreasing childhood obesity. The aim of this substudy of the Coordinated Approach To Child Health (CATCH): En Vivo was to evaluate a brief Motivational Enhancement Interview (MEI) program to encourage removal of the television from the child's bedroom.

Methods:

This quasi-experimental study targeted primarily Hispanic parents of 2nd graders (N= 240) recruited from schools in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Of the 181 who agreed to participate in this study, 120 were in the control group and 61 in the MEI group. Parents completed questionnaires about their child's media habits. Those in the intervention group received two telephone calls in either English or Spanish. Unconditional logistic regression analyses with the pre-test variable and intervention status as covariates were used to predict group membership.

Results:

At pre-test, 63.16% of 2nd graders had a television in their bedrooms. The CATCH: En Vivo 2nd grade MEI intervention reduced that number to 41.03% (OR=0.25, 95%CI (0.08-0.82)). Both MEI calls were lasted under 15 minutes, as designed. Families were reached within 2.91calls (sd=1.90) for the initial MEI call and just slightly more tries for call 2 (͞x=3.26; sd=2.31).

Discussion:

Parents play a key role in younger children's TV viewing behavior. This first look at using MEI to target parents of children to modify TV behavior presents evidence on a promising strategy for modifying children's home media environment and warrants further investigation.

Learning Objectives:
1.Describe role of sedentary behavior related to overweight in children. 2.Describe the potential impact of television time on overweight in children. 3.Describe CATCH: En Vivo brief motivational enhancement interview (MEI) aimed at parents to reduce TV time. 4.Describe results of the CATCH: En Vivo MEI in motivating parents to set rules for TV time. 5.Discuss next steps of the CATCH: En Vivo MEI.

Keywords: Child Health Promotion, School-Based Programs

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am a PhD candidate in Behavioral Sciences and was the primary designer of the intervention reported on in this study. I have a master's degree in clinical psychology, have defended my dissertation and will graduate with my PhD in May 2009. Additionally, I presented at the College of Problems of Drug Dependence in 1998 and have co-authored 2 book chapters. I am currently making ready 2 journal articles for submission to peer-reviewed journals.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.