207578 Protege tu Familia-Hazte la Prueba (Protect your Family-Get Tested): Results from a culturally relevant community-based HIV prevention intervention

Tuesday, November 10, 2009: 4:30 PM

Britt Rios-Ellis, PhD, MS , NCLR/CSULB Center for Latino Community Health, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Laura Hoyt D'Anna, DrPH , NCLR/CSULB Center for Latino Community Health, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Melawhy L. Garcia, BA , NCLR/CSULB Center for Latino Community Health, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
There is a paucity of HIV/AIDS prevention programs that account for Latino culture and a lack of perceived personal HIV risk among Latinos. This project was designed to increase HIV/AIDS knowledge, intention to HIV test, self-efficacy for communication about safer sex behaviors, and safer sex behaviors among Spanish speaking Latinos accessing community-based health services in Long Beach and San Ysidro, California. A quasi-experimental design was used to test the efficacy of an HIV prevention intervention that was developed through community participatory techniques. Community health workers (promotores) delivered a 90-minute informal education session (charla) based on the Community Health Outreach and Information, Motivation, and Behavior for HIV Risk Reduction Models to over 400 participants. A one-month telephone follow-up was conducted to assess behavior changes. Seventy percent of the participants were female, with a mean age of 35 years. The majority was born in Mexico (55%) and Spanish was the preferred language for most (62%). Only 44% indicated they had previously tested for HIV and the most common reason cited for not testing was I don't need it. Upon completion of data collection, outcome analyses will be conducted to determine whether there are statistically significant improvements in HIV-related knowledge, intention to HIV test, self-efficacy for communication about safer sex behaviors, and intention to use condoms associated with charla participation. Further, associations between participant characteristics and improvements in follow-up scores will be examined. Participant evaluations of the charla and its effectiveness will also be presented along with policy implications of the study findings.

Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to: 1. Describe effective strategies for preventing HIV infection among Latinos. 2. Discuss effective community-based strategies for increasing the knowledge of Latinos about their risk for developing HIV infection.

Keywords: HIV Interventions, Community-Based Health Promotion

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have been involved with the Latino population in California for several years, working to reduce health disparities, particularly in the area of HIV and AIDS
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.