222699 No More Excuses: Building Trust and Capacity through the Bioethics Research Infrastructure Initiative

Tuesday, November 9, 2010 : 5:18 PM - 5:30 PM

Sandra C. Quinn, PhD , Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences & Research Center of Excellence in Minority Health Disparities, University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA
Stephen B. Thomas, PhD , Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences & Research Center of Excellence in Minority Health Disparities, University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA
Mary A. Garza, PhD, MPH , Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences & Research Center of Excellence in Minority Health Disparities, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA
Craig Fryer, DrPH , Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences & Research Center of Excellence in Minority Health Disparities, University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Healht, Pittsburgh, PA
James Butler, DrPH , Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences & Research Center of Excellence in Minority Health Disparities, University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA
Background: To date, the NIH mandate for inclusion of minorities and the regulatory responses to the protection of human subjects have not been sufficient to overcome lingering distrust, challenges, and other obstacles to the participation of minorities in research. Increasing minority recruitment and retention in biomedical and public health research rests on a comprehensive understanding of the factors that affect recruitment and retention from the perspectives of multiple stakeholders: researchers, IRBs, and community members. However, most research has focused on community members without understanding the perspectives of critical components of the research enterprise: IRBs, researchers and minority communities themselves. Methods: This presentation will draw upon both qualitative and quantitative results from the following: 1) an online survey (n=1500) of members of Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research and other NIH researchers; 2) qualitative interviews conducted with 30 investigators who work with minority communities; and, 3) a telephone survey of a national sample (n=3,000) of African Americans and Hispanic Americans. Results: The presentation will summarize common themes across these three data collection efforts, including, but not limited to issues of trust, research team composition, best practices in recruitment/retention, and challenges encountered. Conclusions: The presentation will focus on the next steps needed to inform curricula development for communities and research investigators. These curricula products will aim to strengthen the capacity of investigators and communities to effectively work together for the purposes of increasing participation of minorities in research.

Learning Areas:
Diversity and culture
Ethics, professional and legal requirements
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
By the end of this session, participants will be able to: Articulate key factors that affect minority participation in research; and Describe potential implications for education of community members, researchers and IRBs.

Keywords: Research Ethics, Health Disparities

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am the PI on this study.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.