233678 Alcohol use and sexual risk behaviors in a population-based sample of gay or bisexual men in San Francisco

Tuesday, November 9, 2010

Thomas M. Rice, MPH, PhD , Department of Environmental Health Services, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
Adam Carrico, MS, PhD , Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
William Woods, PhD , Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Lance Pollack, PhD , Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Background: Numerous studies have examined alcohol, drug use, and sexual risk in convenience samples of men who have sex with men (MSM). Few probability samples of MSM are available for characterization. The objectives of this analysis were to estimate the prevalence of moderate or heavy alcohol use among urban MSM and to estimate associations between alcohol use and sexual risk behaviors.

Methods: The 2002 Urban Men's Health Study was a household-based, stratified probability sample of men who have sex with men in San Francisco. The study used telephone interviews to obtain information on demographics, drug and alcohol use, HIV testing and status, sexual behaviors, childhood sexual abuse, and health-related beliefs and attitudes. Categorical methods were used to describe the sample, and statistic procedures were adjusted to account for sampling scheme.

Results: Of 710 respondents, 339 reported frequent light drinking (48%) and 47 reported frequent heavy drinking (7%). Frequent drinking was higher among men who reported having unprotected receptive anal intercourse (60% vs 52%, p=0.01) and among those who reported having unprotected insertive anal intercourse (61% vs 50%, p=0.02). Alcohol use increased with educational attainment (p=0.0001), and was lower among HIV-positive MSM (41% vs 60%, p=0.002). Alcohol use did not vary significantly by Hispanic identify (p=0.19) or use of sexual venues (p=0.24).

Conclusions: This analysis found that moderate and heavy drinking were prevalent among urban MSM. Multivariate regression will be used to estimate associations between alcohol use and sexual risk, and multiple imputation will be used to address missing data values.

Learning Areas:
Epidemiology

Learning Objectives:
1.Identify the sampling methods used in the San Francisco 2002 Urban Menís Health Study 2.Describe the prevalence of moderate and heavy alcohol use among the studyís survey respondents 3.Describe the associations between alcohol use and reported sexual risk behaviors

Keywords: HIV Risk Behavior, Gay Men

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: Doctorate in Epidemiology since 2004
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.