246910 Implications from a 2009 representative health survey of public housing older residents in NYC

Tuesday, November 1, 2011: 12:48 PM

Richard Greene, MBA , Director, Resident Support Services, New York City Housing Authority, New York, NY
Elizabeth Needham Waddell, PhD , Bureau of Epidemiology Services, NYC Deptartment of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, NY
Anne-Marie Flatley , Director, Research & Management Analysis, New York City Housing Authority, New York, NY
Hilary Parton, MPH , Bureau of Epidemiology Services, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, NY
Lorna Thorpe, PhD , Director, Epidemiology and Biostatistics Program, CUNY School of Public Health - Hunter College, New York, NY
Nalini Viswanathan , Social Work Supervisor, Resident Support Services, New York City Housing Authority, New York, NY
Allan Uribe , Epidemiology and Biostatistics Program, CUNY School of Public Health - Hunter College, New York, NY
Nancy Ralph , Epidemiology and Biostatistics Program, CUNY School of Public Health - Hunter College, New York, NY
Amanda E. Schneider, MS, MPH , Bureau of Epidemiology Services, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, NY
More than 10% of poor New York City (NYC) seniors live in public housing. We examined disease burden and mobility limitations among seniors residing in NYC Housing Authority (NYCHA) buildings, compared findings to all NYC seniors and those living below 100% poverty level, and identified program/policy implications.

A telephone survey of 1036 NYCHA residents aged 65 and older was conducted (response rate = 35%, cooperation rate = 93%) with a representative sample selected from NYCHA's Tenant Data System (TDS). Survey respondents and non-respondents had similar vision, hearing, and mobility disability levels, per NYCHA's TDS. Demographics were similar except Spanish-speaking residents were under-represented (p<0.05). Data were weighted by gender, income, borough, age, and race/ethnicity to represent NYCHA's senior population.

93% of seniors reported at least one, and 79% reported two or more, of the following physician-diagnosed conditions: hypertension [HTN], hypercholesterolemia [HCL], arthritis, osteoporosis, diabetes. HTN and diabetes were elevated compared to NYC seniors overall but were not significantly higher than poor seniors. Nearly all participants with diagnosed conditions reported current medication regimens (HTN 95%, diabetes 84%, HCL 85%), yet more than half (57%) reported no Medicare Part-D coverage. 29% identified at least one activity of daily living (ADL) limitation and 12% identified 3-6. Half (47%) of seniors with 3-6 ADL limitations reported using transportation services; only 10% reported getting meals delivered.

NYCHA senior residents have a high prevalence of chronic and limiting conditions, similar to poor seniors, but key opportunities exist to target services in this population.

Learning Areas:
Epidemiology
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
1. Describe disease burden and mobility limitations among older residents in NYC public housing. 2. Compare disease burden and disability among older adults in NYC public housing, in NYC and in the US, overall and by income. 3. Identify programmatic and policy implications of study findings.

Keywords: Aging, Community Health

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified be an abstract author because I analyzed survey data, wrote and edited portions of the published report on the survey, and contributed to discussions about the survey's implications.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.