252605 A risk analysis of vector borne disease in Mobile County, Alabama using GIS and remote sensing

Monday, October 31, 2011

Josh Stodghill, Medical Student , Mobile County Health Department, DEVELOP National Program, Mobile, AL
Walt Clark, Student intern , Mobile County Health Department, DEVELOP National Program, Mobile, AL
Charles White, Student Intern , Mobile County Health Department, DEVELOP National Program, Mobile, AL
Christopher Frederick, Student Intern , Mobile County Health Department, DEVELOP National Program, Mobile, AL
Melinda Bottenfield, Student Intern , Mobile County Health Department, DEVELOP National Program, Mobile, AL
Alyson Cederholm, Student Intern , Mobile County Health Department, DEVELOP National Program, Mobile, AL
Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus (EEE) and West Nile virus (WNV) predominantly affect the eastern United States' coastal plains region. Although these viruses infect a wide range of animals they are generally maintained in nature through a bird-mosquito cycle. Mobile County, AL has had sporadically reported human cases of EEE and WNV infections within recent years. In an effort to track the diseases, the Mobile County Health Department uses sentinel flocks to identify areas where the vector is present; however, this effort is limited by the number of sentinel flocks. This project provided new insight through the use of NASA Earth Observing Systems (EOS). By focusing on the individual components that make up the chain of infection of WNV and EEE, the study identified areas of increased risk for the genesis of a vector born disease outbreak. Utilizing land-use land-cover, soil moisture, topography, and precipitation demographic data collected by NASA EOS, partner satellites, and ground based sensors, likely areas of vector and reservoir habitats were assessed. By overlaying these habitats, likely areas of infected vectors were identified. At-risk communities were identified based on Census Bureau data, high risk facilities, and the predicted infected vector habitats. Data and results from this project were provided to the Mobile County Health Department Department of Vector Control to assist future vector management practices.

Learning Areas:
Environmental health sciences
Epidemiology
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
Demonstrate applications of remote sensing, soil profile, and census bureau data to enhance vector management.

Keywords: West Nile Encephalitis, Environmental Health

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified to present because I over see remote sensing projects such as vector borne disease risk assessment projects.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.