264588 Association of Health Care Provider Counseling and Individuals Trying to Reduce Caloric Intake with Reported Use of Calorie Information at Fast Food and Chain Restaurants, U.S. Adults, 2010

Monday, October 29, 2012

Holly Wethington, PhD , Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Leah Michele Maynard, PhD , Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Heidi M. Blanck, PhD , Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Introduction: Calorie information at point-of-selection in restaurants can help inform choices by patrons. Although findings to date suggest that certain subgroups including racial and ethnic minorities report less use of calorie information, there is not information on whether having a health care provider counsel on reducing calories and whether one is trying to reduce calories in his/her diet are associated with using calorie information. Methods: We analyzed data from the 2010 HealthStyles Survey, a mailed population-based survey of adults (n=4037). We used multivariable logistic regression to examine whether counseling or trying to reduce calories were associated with using information, after controlling for sociodemographics. Results: A total of 51.0% reported using calorie information when ordering at fast food/chain restaurants; 18.7% reported that a health care provider counseled on reducing calories in the past 12-months and 38.2% reported they were trying to reduce calories. Having a health care provider counsel was not associated with using calorie information (aOR=1.2, 95%CI=0.9-1.6). Adults who reported trying to reduce calories had higher odds of using calorie information compared to those who were not (aOR=3.7, 95%CI=3.0-4.7). Discussion: Recalling that a health care provider counseled to reduce calories was not related to using calorie information. Not surprisingly, there was a strong association between actively trying to reduce calories and using calorie information. Research is needed on whether specific types of calorie counseling may resonate with adults so that providers can play a role in helping this information be utilized.

Learning Areas:
Public health or related education
Public health or related organizational policy, standards, or other guidelines
Public health or related public policy
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
1. Identify the proportion of US adults who reported using calorie information when ordering at fast food or chain restaurants; 2. Identify the proportion of US adults who reported a health care provider counseled them to reduce the number of calories in their diet over the past 12 months and if this is associated with using calorie information at fast food or chain restaurants; and 3. Identify the proportion of US adults who reported they were trying to reduce calories in their diet and if this is associated with using calorie information at fast food or chain restaurants.

Keywords: Nutrition, Environment

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: Captain Blanck currently oversees CDCís monitoring of state obesity prevalence and key behavioral and systems supports for obesity prevention and control. Captain Blanck serves as Chief of the Obesity Prevention and Control Branch. Staff within the branch focus on surveillance, applied research and evaluation, and guidelines development related to topics including body mass index (BMI), nutrition standards, drinking water access, and screentime.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.