270339 Psychological comorbidity and vitamin d levels among women with type II diabetes: Findings from the North Carolina neurocognition risk reduction diabetes study

Monday, October 29, 2012

Alethea Amponsah, BA BS , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston Salem, NC
Kara Morrison, BA , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC
Anna Queen, BA , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston Salem, NC
Maria Isabel Rego, BA , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston Salem, NC
Da' Lauren Mouzon-Smith , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Winston Salem State University, Winston Salem, NC
Erica Sickelbaugh, BS, BS , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, High Point, NC
Hyunseung Lee , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC
Madeleine Langr , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC
Michelle Wright , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Winston Salem State University, Winston Salem, NC
Leonardo Tjahjono , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC
David Mount, PsyD, MA , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC
Introduction: Inadequate levels of vitamin D have been linked to impaired insulin synthesis and secretion, and increased incidence of depression and anxiety. However, vitamin D's role among women with Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM) and comorbid depression and/or anxiety is still unknown. As risk factors for dementia, depression and/or anxiety are also linked to increased mortality risk among this population. This study aimed to explore vitamin D levels among women with T2DM and comorbid depression/anxiety. Methods: Data was obtained through retrospective chart review. Depression/anxiety was determined by presence of diagnosis or health care provider note. Vitamin D levels were measured by presence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and 1-25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2 D] testing. Results: Participants (n=124) were predominantly female (77%) African Americans (61%), between the ages 26 and 65 (SD 9.66, Mean=51). Among women, 51% had history of depression, 40% had history of anxiety. Median vitamin D level was 23 (478) ng/dL. Seventy percent of women had vitamin D deficiency (lowest value to 20 ng/dL) and insufficiency (21-29 ng/dL), 33% and 37% respectively. However, among all women, only 2 had a diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency reported in their medical record. Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest inadequate levels of vitamin D may be overlooked as a health risk factor and linked to increased prevalence of psychological disturbance among women with T2DM. Due to its connection to both diabetes management and neurocognitive risk, it is important that the relationship between psychological disturbance and vitamin D deficiency in women with T2DM be investigated.

Learning Areas:
Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs
Chronic disease management and prevention
Epidemiology
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
To discuss vitamin D levels among women with T2DM and comorbid depression and/or anxiety and adverse neurocognitive risk and development.

Keywords: Diabetes, Mental Health

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Not Answered