142nd APHA Annual Meeting and Exposition

Annual Meeting Recordings are now available for purchase

298787
What about the boys? Examining the characteristics of male teens who report ever getting a female pregnant

142nd APHA Annual Meeting and Exposition (November 15 - November 19, 2014): http://www.apha.org/events-and-meetings/annual
Monday, November 17, 2014 : 3:10 PM - 3:30 PM

Shanna Cox, MSPH , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Karen Pazol, PhD , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Lee Warner, PhD , division of reproductive health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Alison Spitz, MPH , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Lisa Romero, PhD , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Wanda Barfield, MD, MPH , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Background

Actions to prevent teen pregnancy typically focus on adolescent females. Teenage males should also be actively engaged in prevention efforts.

Methods

National Survey of Family Growth 2006-2010 data were used to describe sexually-experienced male teens age 15-19  that report ever getting a female pregnant. The association between receipt of formal sex education and parent communication about sex with sexual risk behaviors was evaluated. Differences in percentages were assessed using chi-square tests.

Results

Nearly half (46%) of male teens age 15-19 have ever had sex (N=1090); one in six sexually-experienced teen males (17%) report ever getting a female pregnant.  This proportion varied by race/ethnicity; 24% of non-Hispanic black and 23% of Hispanic male teens report ever causing a pregnancy as compared to 11% of non-Hispanic whites. Compared to sexually-experienced males who never  reported getting a female pregnant, those who did  were more likely to initiate sex at age < 15 (60% vs. 28%) and report no contraceptive use at first (30% vs. 11%) or last sex (23% vs 3%). Those who reported no formal sex education were more likely to initiate sex at age < 15 (57.4% vs. 29% among those who report receipt). Those who reported no parent communication about sex were more likely to not use contraception at last sex (11.1% vs. 2.2% among those who report receipt).

Conclusions

A noteworthy proportion of sexually-experienced teen males report ever getting a female pregnant. Evidence-based approaches to delay initiation of sex and provide contraceptive services are needed for young males.

Learning Areas:

Epidemiology
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
Describe the characteristics of male adolescents who report ever getting a female pregnant

Keyword(s): Menís Health, Teen Pregnancy

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am a health scientist with the Division of Reproductive Health at the Centers for Disease Control for the past 7 years. I have published extensively on a wide range of topics, including adolescent health, preconception care and health care services research. I have also served as a subject matter expert in the administration of a collaborative initiative to implement and test community-wide, multi-component approaches to preventing teen pregnancies.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.