142nd APHA Annual Meeting and Exposition

Annual Meeting Recordings are now available for purchase

300109
Community Building Community: The distinct benefits of community partners building other communities' capacity to conduct health research

142nd APHA Annual Meeting and Exposition (November 15 - November 19, 2014): http://www.apha.org/events-and-meetings/annual
Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Jerome Turner, MS , Boys Girls Adult Community Development Center, Marvell, AR
Johnny Smith , Shiloh Baptist Church, Pine Bluff, AR
Keneshia Bryant, PhD, RN, APN , College of Nursing & College of Public Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Studies, Little Rock, AR
TIffany Haynes, PhD , University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR
Dennis Kuo, MD , College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR
M. Kate Stewart, MD, MPH , Office of Community-Based Public Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Fay W. Boozman College of Public Health, Little Rock, AR
Kimberly Harris, PhD , University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR
Stephanie Williams, MPH , University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR
Stephanie Williams, MPH , University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR
Anna Huff, MPH , Mid Delta Community Consoritium, West Helena, AR
J. Sullivan, MD, MSPH , Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Translational Research Institute, Little Rock, AR
Karen Yeary, PhD , Health Behavior and Health Education Department, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR
OBJECTIVES: Academic partners typically build community capacity for research. We describe the benefits of a model where communities share their “best practices” for the purpose of building capacity in health research.  

METHODS: In the context of a grant designed to engage African American faith communities to address health disparities (FAITH in the Delta), two counties exchanged their “best practices” to conduct a collective health assessment. One county trained the other to create a county-wide faith-based network focused on promoting health, whereby the other county trained the other in the administration of a community-based health assessment tool. Both counties then worked together to systematically gather health assessment data in 26 churches (n=448) in their respective counties.  

RESULTS: There were numerous strengths in engaging communities to build each other’s capacity to conduct research. Communities were more receptive to capacity building efforts because of the other community’s ability to truly identify with them (i.e. understand the plight of their people); express genuineness (i.e. in contrast to academics, the community would still be there if there was no research project); convey legitimacy (i.e. communities are not expected to talk about health research, so when communities speak, communities listen); and provide insider knowledge on how to overcome challenges specific to working with communities. Communities building communities also served as a model of being and action (“they are like us”), resulted in the engagement of key community gatekeepers, and built fiscal capacity.  

CONCLUSIONS: Engaging communities with each other is a valuable model to build research capacity.

Learning Areas:

Public health or related research
Systems thinking models (conceptual and theoretical models), applications related to public health

Learning Objectives:
Describe the benefits of communities building community capacity to conduct health research Describe the distinct strengths community partners offer in building community capacity (distinct from academic partners) Describe the model through which communities can build each otherís capacity

Keyword(s): Community-Based Research (CBPR), Community-Based Partnership & Collaboration

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have conducted community-based participatory research for over 15 years.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.