142nd APHA Annual Meeting and Exposition

Annual Meeting Recordings are now available for purchase

306689
Reducing Latina girls' exposure to hormone disrupting chemicals in cosmetics: The HERMOSA Study

142nd APHA Annual Meeting and Exposition (November 15 - November 19, 2014): http://www.apha.org/events-and-meetings/annual
Monday, November 17, 2014 : 8:30 AM - 8:50 AM

Kimberly Parra , Clinica de Salud del Valle de Salinas, HERMOSA Study, Salinas, CA
Kim Harley, PhD , Center for Environmental Research in Children's Health (CERCH), University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
Katherine Kogut, MPH , Center for Environmental Research in Children's Health (CERCH), University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
Brenda Eskenazi, MA, PhD , Center for Environmental Research in Children's Health (CERCH), University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
Asa Bradman, PhD , Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health (CERCH), University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
Daniel Madrigal, MPH , Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health (CERCH), University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
Jianwen She, PhD , Environmental Health Laboratory Branch, California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA
Objectives: The Health & Environmental Research in Make-up of Salinas Adolescents (HERMOSA) Study is an intervention to examine Latina girls’ exposure to hormone disrupting chemicals in cosmetics and personal care products and to determine methods for lowering this exposure.  

Methods: Study participants were 14-18 year old girls (N=100) living in predominantly Latino neighborhoods of Salinas, California. At the initial visit, participants provided detailed information on all personal care products use in the previous 48 hours and a urine sample for measurement of phthalates, triclosan, parabens, and oxybenzone – 4 common endocrine disruptors found in personal care products.  The girls were then given alternate, low-chemical products to use for 3 days and then returned for a follow-up visit to determine whether urinary endocrine disruptors levels had decreased. This project is a youth-based, participatory research project and so all recruitment and data collection was performed by Youth Researchers from the community who also helped with project design.

Results:  Preliminary analyses show that urinary metabolites of diethyl phthalate, used in fragrances, decreased significantly during the intervention (baseline geometric mean (GM) = 40.3 ng/mL vs. post-intervention GM = 31.7 ng/mL, one-side p-value = 0.03).  No changes were seen in metabolites of two other phthalates (dibutyl phthalate and di-isobutyl phthalate) also used in personal care products.  Future analyses will compare triclosan, parabens, and oxybenzone concentrations before and after the intervention.  We will also present associations between use of specific personal care products and urinary phthalate, triclosan, parabens, and oxybenzone concentrations.

Conclusions:  This study demonstrates that exposure to certain endocrine disruptors may be reduced by simple changes in personal care product routines.  Next steps include Youth Researchers leading an environmental health campaign to disseminate study findings via presentations, social media, and educational materials.

Learning Areas:

Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs
Advocacy for health and health education
Environmental health sciences
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs

Learning Objectives:
Identify endocrine disrupting chemicals found in cosmetics and personal care products Describe effective methods for reducing Latina adolescentsí exposure to endocrine disruptors. Assess community-based participatory research methods to involve youth in scientific research and effecting change among their peers.

Keyword(s): Environmental Health, Youth

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am the co-principal investigator of the HERMOSA Study, an youth-led intervention to reduce endocrine disruptor exposure in adolescent girls. I am also the Field Office Manager of the CHAMACOS Study, a long-term, longitudinal cohort study investigating environmental exposures on children's health.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.